How To Make Solid Bubble Bath on Soap Queen TV

Learn to make Solid Buble Bath Bars on Soap Queen TV

It took me over a year of testing and formulating to find the perfect recipe for Solid Bubble Bath. It dries to a solid bar – but isn’t so hard that you can’t crumble it up with your fingers. Rolling up the bar is a little tricky to get the cute swirl in the center, but if you’ve ever made sushi or a jelly roll cake you will be a pro at this. And, nothing says you can’t start easy and just go with one color instead of the double color that I show in this video.

The recipe for the Solid Bubble Bath is:

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Solid Bubble Bath Recipe

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194 Comments

  1. Oksana says

    Hello, I have a question, is it obligatory to add cream of tartar and can it be substituted with something else? Another question is about tapioca powder, can this ingredient be substituted with another ingredient (we don’t have tapioca powder where I live:)? Last question about SLSA, is there any other ingredient that doesn’t contain LS that can be added instead? Many thanks!

  2. says

    Thanks so much for sharing your recipe! You saved me years of trial and error trying to develop a recipe that I can be happy with. When I use one of your recipes, I know your knowledge, expertise, and creativity went into it to make it great.

    I have been anxious for this recipe ever since you said you were working on one. Even though I’ve been waiting on the edge of my seat :-), I appreciate that you didn’t put the recipe out there for us to try until you got it just right and were pleased with the quality of the finished product.

    Thanks again!

    • says

      Hi Jean! Thanks for the comments. We can’t wait for you to try this recipe out. It is just so super bubbly and fun in the tub. I was lucky enough to be one of the testers for this and can’t get enough of it. =) Keep us updated on your progress.

      Happy Bubble Bath Making!
      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  3. says

    For people concerned with sulfates and synthetics, SLSA is NOT a sulfate and be aware that Anne Marie was mistaken when she called Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate synthetic.

    SLSA is safe skin botanically derived surfactant (foaming agent) excellent for both skin and hair products that produces a rich lather. It has a large molecular size which will not absorb into the skin or mucus membranes, such as sulfates do (they have a small molecular size), and thus it is non-irritating to those parts of the body – with an upper threshold of about 70% for skin products such as bubble bath. In shampoos, to avoid eye irritation, it should not make up more than 3% of the product volume.

    The chemical name, when broken down to it’s constituent components tells you what it is made of.

    Sodium: a solid mineral salt – It acts as the counterion (pronounced as two words, “counter ion,” but should always be written as one word) – It simply maintains the electrical neutrality of the molecule. i.e. no INHERENT static charge. It works exactly the same way as it does in sodium chloride (table salt), which is a conductor, but has no inherent static charge.

    Lauryl: Chemical shorthand for Dodecanol, aka Lauryl Alcohol – This is the hydrophobic (repelled by water) part of the molecule. On it’s own, it is a colourless, water insoluble solid obtained from the reduction of coconut, palm and/or palm kernal fatty acids (oils) combined with methyl esters (natural organic compounds). It has a slightly sweet, floral aroma.

    Sulfoacetate: The hydrophilic (attracted to water) part of the molecule. A combination of sulfur and acetate (present in all biological cells and necessary for biosynthesis – the process cells use to make other chemical compounds to grow and feed other cells in the body – aka, a building block of life). The sulfur is there to help the acetate create stable bubbles and soft lather.

    • Anne-Marie says

      Thanks for your note! It’s great; so much fantastic information.

      My personal opinion is that the product is a synthetic but I also have a fairly strict definition (which isn’t a legal definition as we know) of what defines natural and not natural.

      My thinking is: If you can create it with minimum effort in nature (i.e. boiling an herb to get the essential oil or grinding the nut to get the oil), it’s natural. If you have to react things in a lab and there’s zero way to make it from what is available from nature, it’s not what I consider natural.

      I agree 100% that it is entirely safe (I wouldn’t use it, nor promote it if I didn’t believe it to be safe). It is Ecocert certified and is natural in origin. But, in my opinion, it doesn’t fit under what I believe the general public would call “natural” and so I don’t call it that in the video. But, it’s a total personal preference on what one person’s natural is versus another person’s so I think there is room for both of our views =)

      • says

        I understand what you are saying and I agree. I would not call SLSA “natural” either, but that does not make it synthetic. It’s not a black and white world. there are a billion shades of grey and perspective certainly matters. Personally, I find the term “botanically derived” to be the most accurate in this case.

      • says

        As a biochemist I have to agree with Anne-Marie, SLS is not considered Natural. That doesn’t mean the origin is not from plant, but all molecules come from nature. From the chemotherapy drugs I use to surfactants. If the base structure is found in nature, but then we modify it chemically then it is not “natural”…it is a derivative of a natural phytochemical. That doesn’t mean it’s not safe..just that is has been altered and most of the time altered to become more bioavailable, more stable, and most of the time safer.

  4. Leanne Penn says

    Hi, I was just wondering if La Bomb colourants could be used, as I don’t have any of your lab colours. Awesome video by the way, I can’t wait to try this recipe over the weekend :)

  5. says

    Thank you so much for sharing. It’s been really difficult to find a great recipe. I’ve tried one I’ve seen on the web, but didn’t particularly care for it. I’m definitely going to try this over the weekend and will report back!! I’m excited…

  6. Kenzie says

    Looking at this recipe, I got so excited. I have another recipe for bubble bars but they always feel a bit squishy, even when dried. My first attempt to make these.. Did not go as planned, to say the least. They now look like squishy mounds of icing, lol. My second attempt turned out beautifully though. I can’t wait to let them dry and try them out. By far the best bubble bar recipe I’ve found. I love brambleberry :)

  7. Patricia says

    Sounds great! But just wondering about the necessity of needing a preservative since glycerin is a humectant. I’ve read that using ABOVE a certain percentage of glycerin(I’ve seen numbers widely vary…between 15 – 50%,)the glycerin itself becomes the preservative. UNDER whatever that actual percentage is supposed to be, it’s my understanding that a recipe needs an additional preservative.

    Then there’s the question of packaging. If moisture loss or gain is a problem, shouldn’t it be airtight to avoid moisture loss, keeping them soft, or worse, that “dreaded, icky, bacteria-laden” moisture gain? Shrink wrap maybe?

    Any thoughts on this?

    ~Way confused…

    • Anne-Marie says

      That’s a great question. You are right; glycol does bind to water making the product not growth friendly. When used at 50%, it’s considered a preservative system in and of itself and the FDA say as little as 10% makes glycerin a preservative system. That said, some soapers prefer to use a preservative in anything that contains glycerin because glycerin is a ‘humectant’ which means it draws moisture to itself. However, lots of things are humectants (salt for example, that don’t need preservative). Finally, glycerin is shelf-stable on its own (as you alluded to) without any preservative. So, what’s a soaper to do!? To preserve or not to preserve?

      The recipe above contains 19.4% glycerin, well over the 10% threshold for glycerin not being an issue in your product.

      That said, if you ever are concerned and want to err on the side of caution, definitely use a preservative. You’re the one selling this product, putting your brand name on it and you have to be comfortable with the formulation. In this case, I haven’t tested the pH so I’d go with a safer, more broad spectrum preservative that covered most of the pH options like Phenonip (http://www.brambleberry.com/Phenonip-P4038.aspx) which can be used with products with a pH of 8 or less or Optiphen with no pH restrictions: http://www.brambleberry.com/Optiphen-P3682.aspx

      Finally, the lab that we use whenever we do any sort of challenge testing is Sagescript Institute. Cindy is amazing and so knowledgeable and, has a fast turnaround (having worked with other labs, I can vouch for her) =) http://www.sagescript.com/microbiology

      Regarding wrapping these, I like drying for a week (they’re pretty squishy and unable to travel without a bit of drying) and then you can wrap in cellophane bags or in wax or parchment paper. The wax and parchment paper allow for a bit more breathable which helps to prevent any sort of water clinging.

      Please let me know if you have any other questions =)

      FDA site re: 10% preservation: http://www.fda.gov/iceci/inspections/inspectionguides/ucm074952.htm Note that glycerol and glycerin can be used interchangeably as terms: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycerol

  8. Mary Coe says

    Please answer the question about Tapioca Powder. I have all the other ingredients and would like to make instead of waiting for an order t arrive. Can you get something in the grocery store?

    • Kimeli says

      Mary:

      I’ve used another recipe that includes corn starch. The creator of the recipe recommends potato starch as another alternative. Tapioca starch holds on to fragrance extremely well. I found it at Whole Foods.

      Hope this helps.
      Kimeli

    • says

      Hi Mary! As long as you purchase a powder that only has tapioca in it, you should be just fine. There are some out there that have additives and you definitely wouldn’t want to use those in this recipe. We use Tapioca Powder because it holds the fragrance incredibly well, as well as cutting down on any greasy feelings in the product. Here is a link to our Tapioca Powder which also has it’s INCI listed, as long as yours matches, you should be just fine!

      Tapioca Powder: http://www.brambleberry.com/Tapioca-Powder-P3803.aspx

      I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions. =)
      -Becky with Bramble Berry

    • Anne-Marie says

      I just answered this question tonight for someone else so I’m going to copy the bulk of my answer for you here:

      That’s a great question. You are right; glycol does bind to water making the product not growth friendly. When used at 50%, it’s considered a preservative system in and of itself and the FDA say as little as 10% makes glycerin a preservative system. That said, some soapers prefer to use a preservative in anything that contains glycerin because glycerin is a ‘humectant’ which means it draws moisture to itself. However, lots of things are humectants (salt for example, that don’t need preservative). Finally, glycerin is shelf-stable on its own (as you alluded to) without any preservative. So, what’s a soaper to do!? To preserve or not to preserve?

      The recipe above contains 19.4% glycerin, well over the 10% threshold for glycerin not being an issue in your product.

      That said, if you ever are concerned and want to err on the side of caution, definitely use a preservative. You’re the one selling this product, putting your brand name on it and you have to be comfortable with the formulation. In this case, I haven’t tested the pH so I’d go with a safer, more broad spectrum preservative that covered most of the pH options like Phenonip (http://www.brambleberry.com/Phenonip-P4038.aspx) which can be used with products with a pH of 8 or less or Optiphen with no pH restrictions: http://www.brambleberry.com/Optiphen-P3682.aspx

      Finally, the lab that we use whenever we do any sort of challenge testing is Sagescript Institute. Cindy is amazing and so knowledgeable and, has a fast turnaround (having worked with other labs, I can vouch for her) =) http://www.sagescript.com/microbiology

      Regarding wrapping these, I like drying for a week (they’re pretty squishy and unable to travel without a bit of drying) and then you can wrap in cellophane bags or in wax or parchment paper. The wax and parchment paper allow for a bit more breathable which helps to prevent any sort of water clinging.

      Regarding the shelf life, after one week, the more fresh, the better. I would recommend using this product within 6 months.

      Please let me know if you have any other questions =)

      FDA site re: 10% preservation: http://www.fda.gov/iceci/inspections/inspectionguides/ucm074952.htm Note that glycerol and glycerin can be used interchangeably as terms: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycerol

      • Patricia says

        Wow! You are awesome, A-M! Thank you so much for your thorough clarification! I bow the knee to the Soap Queen!

        So there really IS a wide % range when it comes to thoughts on the use of a preservative on products containing glycerin.

        So if your percentage of glycerin is under 10%, use a preservative, and which one depends on the pH.

        Thank you, too, for the packaging tips and for vouching for Cindy Jones. I already had the Sagescript Institute bookmarked for future use and it’s good to know she comes with your recommendation. When I get to the point where I am selling cosmetic products, I will use her.

        But now that brings up another question. :) How long after production do you wait before sending a product in for testing? Can it be tested right away, or is there a waiting period to see if any icky bad guys have shown up?

        • says

          Hi Patricia!

          There does tend to be a wide range of thoughts when it come to the use of preservatives, but like A-M said, if you ever want to err on the side of caution, use a preservative in your product. And you are correct, which preservative you use with glycerin really does depend on the pH of the product.

          We just adore Sagescript Institute and have used them for some time now and have always had great results. On your question about sending your products in for testing, it really depends which test you go with. Most home crafters are going to use the Common Usage Test which is a more affordable test for those with smaller businesses.

          In this particular test, you would actually first send in a product for testing and if it counts come out to zero, you are assured that you are starting with good GMP (good manufacturing practices) and your product is not contaminated. After you do that, you would take an additional sample from that first batch that you have ‘tried’ to contaminate. You can find out more about this test at Sagescripts website here:

          http://www.sagescript.com/microbiology

          I hope this helps! Let me know if you have an additional questions. :)

          -Becky

          • Patricia says

            Thank you, Becky! Much appreciated! I will check it out. I’m curious to know the difference between the Common Usage Test and the more expensive one other than cost.

  9. says

    I want to test this out, but still have some reservations in regards to the SLSA. I am guessing there is nothing else that can be used in place of this. What I have found, and I quote from http://chemicaloftheday.squarespace.com/todays-chemical/2012/9/25/sodium-lauryl-sulfoacetate.html?lastPage=true&postSubmitted=true:

    “Although it seems to be a “safer” alternative to sodium lauryl sulfate, it still does pose the risk of skin irritation. Additionally, it’s not an environmentally-friendly option, as it takes a long time to bio-degrade and does pollute aquatic ecosystems.”

    This is a major concern, and really would like an alternative if there is one.

    Thanks for all that you do. Love your site(s)!

    • says

      Hi Nancy! I’m sorry that this recipe is giving you a bit of frustration. I’m more than happy to help you troubleshoot this issue! How long did you allow them to setup before you tried cutting them? If you let me know a little more about how you made them I can totally help out. =)
      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  10. Terry says

    I just received my order and have completed my first batch! Absolutely Beautiful!! I can’t wait until they dry so that I can give them out.
    Was wondering if you might have the recipe in cups, tablespoons etc. I have a scale coming.
    Thank you!

    • says

      Hi Terry!

      We are so happy to hear that you were able to get your box and make these super fun solid bubble bath bars. With any of our recipes, we use weight (and not volume) because it is a much more precise way of measuring out a recipe.

      For this particular recipe, Anne-Marie worked for over a year to get these precise calculations so that your solid bubble bath bars would turn out just perfect! You can try using a conversion calculator to get the recipe in cups and tablespoons, but it might not turn out the same.

      I hope this helps! If you have any pictures of your solid bubble bars, we’d love to see how they turned out. You can share them with us on Bramble Berry’s Facebook page.

      https://www.facebook.com/BrambleBerry

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

      • says

        P.S. I actually had a few moments to go and measure the recipe for you in volume! Here is an approximation of what the above recipe would be in:

        1 cup Baking Soda
        1 cup Cream of Tartar
        1/2 cup Cornstarch
        1 tablespoon Tapioca Powder
        1 1/2 cups SLSA
        1/3 – 1/2 cup Glycerin
        1 tablespoon Castor Oil
        2 tablespoons Celestial Waters Fragrance Oil

  11. says

    I’m wondering what other colorants you can use in this recipe that are more “natural” and what amounts would I use them in? If using essential oils in place of fragrance oils, would I still stick to the same amount? Thank you so much. Just ordered all my supplies today. Can’t wait to try these!

  12. "V" says

    My first time posting a comment!!!! So excited watched this video over and over!!! Finally tried my first batch, going on day 5 of drying now and had a question…. My bars are still soft and squishy.. I live in a dry climate so what gives? :) did I do something wrong, use too much of something? Please help…. And thanks AM for everything!!!!!!

    • says

      Good morning, V!

      We are so excited that you tried this recipe out and can’t wait to hear how it works in the tub for you. When you were making your solid bubble bath, did you change anything about the recipe? If you let me know a bit more about how you made them, I can totally help you troubleshoot what is going on with them. =)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

      • "V" says

        Hi Becky, thanks for taking the time to write me. I followed the recipe of the main ingredients to a “t” except for the color. I only used a few drops of liquid color on one half of the batch. Everything was looking good for me, consistency just like in the video and rolling went smooth. I cut them after rolling and placed them apart on parchemnt paper so they had room to breathe and dry. We are in day 7 of drying now and although I can pick them up without them denting, they are not dry in the middle. What are your thoughts?

        Thanks again!!!! Can’t wait to try them in the bath!!!! :)

  13. "V" says

    Hi Becky, thanks for taking the time to write me. I followed the recipe of the main ingredients to a “t” except for the color. I only used a few drops of liquid color on one half of the batch. Everything was looking good for me, consistency just like in the video and rolling went smooth. I cut them after rolling and placed them apart on parchemnt paper so they had room to breathe and dry. We are in day 7 of drying now and although I can pick them up without them denting, they are not dry in the middle. What are your thoughts?

    Thanks again!!!! Can’t wait to try them in the bath!!!! :)

  14. Karen says

    Can you explain the difference between this bubble bar recipe and the other one you have out?
    Is one better than another for a specific purpose? And does it need a preservative since it has liquid glycerin in it?

    • says

      Hi Karen,
      The recipes just contain different ingredients and have a slightly different final texture. They’re not necessarily for specific purposes, they just give you more options to make different kinds of bath bubbles!

      And good news, no preservative needed!

      -Kirsten with Bramble Berry

    • says

      Good morning, Amber!

      If you are using a cookie cutter to shape these, we suggest packing them tightly on the freezer paper and then pressing the cutter in. You definitely want to make sure it is already tightly packed before you use a cookie cutter so that it all stays together. We’d love to see how your solid bubble bath bars turn out, and if you get any pictures be sure to share them on Bramble Berry’s Facebook page.

      https://www.facebook.com/BrambleBerry

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  15. Rosie Carbajal says

    Made the bubble bars last Saturday so it’s been 6 days. The last 2 days we’ve had rain. Right now the bars are firm but still soft on the inside. I did because I’m impatient tried a small piece…OMG! it bubbles nicely…I took a very lovely bath :)
    Thank you so much for sharing the recipe. I can’t wait to start making more!

    • says

      Good morning, Rosie!

      Yay, we are so excited to hear that you have made the solid bubble bath bars! This has been one of my favorite recipes from the Soap Queen blog and I just get so excited when any of our readers end up making them. Did you go with the same colors or choose different ones? I’d give your solid bubble bars a few more days of drying and they should be ready to go! =)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

      P.S. If you have any pictures of your fun creations, be sure to share them with us on Bramble Berry’s Facebook page.

      https://www.facebook.com/BrambleBerry

      • Rosie Carbajal says

        Thanks! I already put them on the facebook page. Mine are the green ones. I will have to check today. Are these supposed to complete harden like bath bombs or will they still be a bit tender? I took a 2nd bubble bar to try out and it’s as good as the 1st one :)

        • says

          Hi Rosie!

          This is such a great recipe and I love it because the bar dries, but isn’t so hard that you wouldn’t be able to crumble it up with your hands in the bathtub. Aren’t they just the best? I got to be a lucky tester while Anne-Marie was formulating these bars and really loved how they turned out. We appreciate your feedback and can’t wait to see more from you. =)

          -Becky with Bramble Berry

    • says

      Hi Matthew!

      Unless notated, all ingredients in our tutorials are by weight and NOT by volume. We find weight to be a much more precise way of measuring our ingredients and works much better for to get those exact measurements. I hope this helps! =)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  16. Myca says

    HI! I love to try making solid bubble bath after watching your tutorial video. However, I cannot find a written instruction (or a recipe) for swirled solid bubble bath. Can you tell me where to find it? Many thanks!

  17. Melissa says

    I made this recipe two weeks ago, followed with the video every step and they are still mushy inside and the bubbles are not great at all. I live in a humid area so I run a dehumidifier in my shop to dry my products. no luck with this one, had better results with the simple recipe I found on e how. really was excited to try this. Wish it would have worked better for me.

    • says

      Hi Melissa!

      We are so excited that you were able to try this recipe out. I am really sorry to hear that this recipe didn’t work out for you. I’d love to help you troubleshoot so that we can help you figure out what might have gone wrong. Sometimes bath fizzies, bombs and even solid bubble bath can react to the humidity in the air and even with a dehumidifier it sounds like this might have happened to your batch. Did you use SLS in your batch? I’d love to hear more about your batch so I can help you figure out what happened. =)

      In the meantime, you can check out this other solid bubble bar recipe that Anne-Marie put together. I really love the essential oil blend and loved how it felt in the bathtub.

      Solid Bubble Bath Recipe: http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/soaks-and-scrubs/solid-bubble-bath-recipe/

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

      P.S. The best way to get the most out of your bubble bars is to make sure you place them under the warm running water, simply placing them in the tub isn’t going to make them foam and bubble as they would under the running water. =)

  18. Denette says

    Thank you so much for taking all that time to create and perfect your recipe! I can’t wait to try it! I have added all the ingredients to my wishlist…know I just need to pick a fragrance…or two! :)

    Quick question…I am wondering if any of these ingredients help make the bath water moisturizing? I have only used a bubble bar a couple of times (from a well known brand) and I found the resulting bath to be moisturizing, and that is something that I want to recreate. If none of these ingredient are moisturizing, is there an ingredient in this recipe that I could substitute all or part for a moisturizing oil or melted butter?

  19. Sarah says

    I’m very excited to try this recipe for my nephews’ bath time fun! I’m thinking animal shapes. They have sensitive skin and are limited in the number of bubble baths they can take, but little boys need bubbles once in a while!!!!

    I am wondering about the baking soda+cream of tartar+cornstarch, which is essentially an alkali+an acid salt+ an inert starch. Can I just use baking powder which is, in effect, the same combination? I know cream of tartar is a low temp acid salt, and the sodium aluminum sulfate in baking powder is a high temp (double acting) acid salt. Would this be the issue? Is it that BP doesn’t create the right reaction in the recipe and/or is it too PH neutral?
    Also, can I substitute the same amount of sodium coco-sulfate for SLSA in the recipe? I know I won’t get the same amount of bubbles, but it is my surfactant of choice for sensitive skin, when necessary. What about some shea butter (0.5 ounces) for extra moisture?

    Thanks so much for all of your helpful information and recipes.

    • says

      Good morning, Sarah!

      This recipe is so much fun, especially for the kids with all the fun bubbles. If your nephews have sensitive skin, you might want to take the SLS out as it can irritate those with more irritable skin. Just a note, if you do take it out, you won’t have as many big and fluffy bubbles in this recipe.

      With this particular recipe, Anne-Marie spent over a year perfecting it and found that this was the exact ratio of ingredients to make it work fabulously in the bath. You can add Shea Butter to the recipe, but be aware that it will change the overall texture of the batch. If you’d like to try out your recipe, I would suggest a small test batch to see if works for you. You can also try the following recipe which is a base of Baking Soda, Cream of Tartar and Liquid Soap Concentrate.

      Solid Bubble Bath Recipe: http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/soaks-and-scrubs/solid-bubble-bath-recipe/

      Let us know what you end up going with! :)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

    • says

      Hi Sophie!

      What kind of bubble bath is it? Anne-Marie actually carefully formulated this recipe over the last year and found that this combination of ingredients worked the best for us. You could try substituting bubble bath for the liquid soap concentrate in a small batch to see if it works well for you! Let us know what you end up trying. :)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  20. Elizabeth says

    I have the liquid soap concentrate base that I got awhile back to make the original bars; would I be able to use it instead of the glycerin in the recipe? I know it isn’t the same, but I wondered if it would make the recipe more bubbly, or if it just wouldn’t work…

    • says

      Hi Alexis!

      Not a weird question at all! Depending on how you form your loaf and thick you cut your bars, this recipe is going to make anywhere from 8-12. The weight will change as the wet ingredients evaporate from the bar, but a general weight for each of the bars would be around 3.0 – 3.5 ounces a piece. I hope this helps! =)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

    • says

      Hi Audrie!

      We found that the liquid LabColors worked the best for us in this project, but you can use mica to color it as well. Be sure to make a small test batch to see how you like the color you are using first! Let us know how yours turns out, we’d love to see pictures if you are able to get any. =)

      -Becky with Bramble Berry

  21. says

    I like to use powder color I have that does not stain the tub, but it seems like it would be very hard to divide the dough perfectly, then add half of the liquid to one dough and half the liquid to the other. I’m sure one side would get too much liquid and the other side wouldn’t have enough, and it seems too hard to split the recipe in half from the beginning, so I was wondering, how hard it would be to add powder color at the end? Would it work, it would make it so much easier.

  22. angelica says

    Hello, so excited to try this out! Sorry I’m a little new to all of this but would I need to use the labcolor for the m&p or for the cp because I saw they were for a different ph and Im wanting to do a yellow color. Thanks!

  23. Megan says

    I have made this recipe twice and each time they never dry. I live in northern New Mexico in a higher altitude and have to adjust my regular baking with extra flour. Could this be what is happening here? I love these and want to make more but not if I can’t get them to dry… :( Has anyone else had this happen before? Thanks!!

    • says

      Hi Megan!

      That could be why you are experiencing the softness in your bubble bath. Did you change anything else from the original recipe? I’d love to try and figure out why it’s not working for you!

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  24. cdugral@yahoo.de says

    I love all your receipes but have a hard time finding some of your ingredients. Tapioca powder? Cream of tartar? Vanilla stabilizer?
    and: the measures: it is really hard to calculate in oz. not very precise.
    could you think of substitutes for some ingredients and will you -someday maybe- give receipes in metric measures or cups. I bought some cup measures for this purpose. Thank you!
    And no, ordering from your website would be almost impossible due to high shipping costs and some items cannot be shipped here….. too bad.

  25. cdugral@yahoo.de says

    I love all your receipes but have a hard time finding some of your ingredients. Tapioca powder? Cream of tartar? Vanilla stabilizer?
    and: the measures: it is really hard to calculate in oz. not very precise.
    could you think of substitutes for some ingredients and will you -someday maybe- give receipes in metric measures or cups. I bought some cup measures for this purpose. Thank you!
    And no, ordering from your website would be almost impossible due to high shipping costs and some items cannot be shipped here….. too bad.

  26. says

    I love your Bubble Bath Bars, thank you for sharing. Question, I used some of my own brown coloring for the bars and they turned the bath brown. If I use your colorants will they turn the bath a color? I would like to do a dark brown, what do you suggest I use this next batch…Having fun, loving these. Thanks again.

  27. Sarah McKergow says

    Hello!

    I have been trying several different recipes for these bubble bars and I can NOT seem to get them to harden once made. I followed your recipe and I am not sure if maybe it’s too cold in our house or too much humidity (we live in Montana) but any suggestions or helpful hints would be so wonderful! I am so sad at not being able to give these soft things away! I mean they still work wonderfully but I just want them to be able to be put in cute wrapping!

    Thank you so much!

    Sarah M.

    • says

      Hi Sarah!

      We have found that these bubble bars take a few days, and possibly up to a week, to harden. If it has been less than a week and are still soft, I would give them a few more days :). Let me know how they are in a few more days, I would be happy to help you troubleshoot!

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  28. Jennifer says

    Hi – I was wondering if I can put these in small molds rather than rolling into a pretty slice? My toddler won’t understand why he’s not able to throw the full slice in…

  29. Lisa says

    Hi, I am interested on ordering your SLSA through BB since that is the only product I’m missing wit for this recipe, and I’m sorry if here is not the proper place to ask about your product detail but I was wondering about the amount of purity your SLSA has? I didn’t really know the importance of purity in it but my husband wanted to ask about that since he also wanted to use it for other purpose I guess, don’t ask me what it is, he wouldn’t tell really!

    • says

      Hi Lisa!

      This product is derived from coconut and palm oils, and conforms to Ecocert’s natural and organic cosmetic standard and is 100% of natural origin.I hope this answers your question :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  30. says

    Hi! I have made these awesome bubble bars twice. Both times I made the recipe exactly like Anne-Marie’s. 1. They didn’t really harden. 2. They turned brown.
    I think I know how to make them harden but I’m stumped at the turning brown? Is it just the nature of having vanilla in the fragrance? Would a vanilla stabilizer help?

    • says

      Hi Suzy!

      The fragrance used in this recipe, Celestial Waters, does not discolor and should not turn your bars brown.If you are using a fragrance with a high vanilla content, that could certainly happen. Vanilla stabilizer would probably help postpone the discoloration, but not get rid of it completely. Sometimes these bars can take a little bit longer to harden depending on the environment. Ours took about 5 days after cutting, but some soapers have needed to wait longer :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  31. Andrea says

    Thanks so much for the recipe Anne-Marie! I just made my first batch last night and I’m pretty sure I used too much fragrance oil :( The consistency is not nearly as firm as yours and I wasn’t able to roll it up. Is there anything I can add to the batch to help it harden up or should I just give it some time to hopefully dry out?

    • says

      Hi Andrea!

      Oh no, I’m sorry to hear you recipe is a little soft. I would recommend giving it some more time. It’s totally possible that they will still firm up :) If the mixture is still in the bowl, waiting to be rolled, you could also add a little bit more dry Cream of Tartar and Corn Starch to dry it up a bit in order to roll it. I hope this helps!

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

    • says

      Hi Chloe!

      While we have never tried this, I do worry about all the liquids in this recipe setting off the fizz! That being said, you could certainly make a small test batch and see how it goes :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  32. Tammy says

    I’ve tried the recipe twice and both times the dough was very very soft. So much so my logs didn’t hold thier shape.

    Once dry though, the wierd shaped rolls made awesome fluffy bubbles.

    Would adding a bit more baking soda to the recipe give it some more stability?

    • says

      Hi Tammy!

      If you’d like, you could add a little bit more baking soda to give it a little more stability. While we haven’t tried this, my guess is that it would give you the texture you are looking for :) I would recommend making a smaller test batch first to see!

      -Amanda

  33. sherrylynn says

    Hi Becky. I tried your recipe for solid bubble bars using the conversion you made for a recipe in cups and such instead of by weight. It wasn’t as mush5 or wet as your other recipe. What would you recommend? Maybe more glycerin or caster oil? Or a lil more of both? I got more the texture of bath bombs…. I also used mica not liquid color but did add 2tbs. Of water….. still kinda dry

  34. sherrylynn says

    Very disappointed. Sounded wonderful. Having used lush products I expected that silky smooth feeling to my bath…. it felt very soapy squeaky clean an very drying…. other than the great smell color an bubbles…. no super silky feeling….

    • says

      Hi Sherrylynn!

      I’m sorry to hear this recipe did not meet your expectations. A lot of people really like the squeaky clean feeling, but it’s definitely a personal preference :). If there is anything I can help you with at this point, let me know! :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  35. Lisa says

    I used A-M’s recipe for my bubble bars and they turned out perfect!!! First time I made them and I couldn’t be happier with the results! Thank you for all you do!!!
    Lisa

  36. Anna says

    Hi, I just tried this recipe and need some help. Instead of a jellyroll style I used a silicone mold. The dough started to rise up a little from the mold I put it in after a few minutes. But now the dough is still very soft after 30 hours and all the bars are all stuck to the mold? I am wondering what I may have done wrong? How long does it take for the bubble bars to dry? Can I add more of SLSA to save these or is there anything else I can do to save this batch? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks

    Anna

    • says

      Hi Anna!

      Sometimes these can take a little bit longer to dry, I have heard some feedback that it can take about a week or so. I would recommend giving them more time, before adding anything more to them. We have found that these do tend to stick to silicone molds. Instead of using a mold, you could cut it differently, or even use a a cookie cutter to get a different shape. While the dough is still soft, you could cut them :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  37. Alyse Hamilton says

    I tried this recipe I kept to recipe I didn’t stearin left I used a different colorant that’s it it’s a liquid colorant. After a few days my ars started to turn brown can you tell what causes that so I can try again please

  38. says

    I made these and they look great for about 24 hours. I made two different batches and on day two of drying they start to turn brown, do you know what I am doing wrong or why they would turn brown? I followed the recipe direction exactly.

  39. natthadon says

    Hi im a big fan of you
    I try to make this recipe but my bebble bath but after i wait for 4-5 days its not solid it going to change a shape like a bit melt some oil is came out. How can i make it solid. Thank you

    • says

      Hi there!

      I’m sorry to hear that your bars are not hardening up! Did you change anything in the recipe? Let me know, I’d love to help! Depending on your climate, I have heard that these bars can take up to a week to fully harden.

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  40. says

    I have a potential wholesale customer who wants to use Argon oil and or Shea butter oil in their line of bubble bars. Is this possible if I just use a little. I have followed the recipe to the letter and it has always turned out perfect for me.

    Thanks Rhonda

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Rhonda!

      We didn’t test this recipe with Argan Oil or Shea Butter, so I’m not exactly sure how it would work! You may want to try a small test batch to see if it’s OK. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  41. Shirley says

    Just made the solid bubble bath and used White Tea and Ginger which was prefect. I noticed in Anne-Marie’s video that the second freezer paper was clean from the dough. I used three and each one had dough on the sheet. All ingredients were well calculated, should it reduce the wet ingredients by .1 ounce? Also I used Mica, if I want two colors (as on the video) would I have to make two separet batches?
    Thanks.
    Shirley

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Shirley!

      Depending on the temperature and humidity of where you live, these can have some transfer on your freezer paper. However, if the end result is a consistency you like you don’t have to alter that recipe. If so, reducing the liquid is a good place to start.

      Anne-Marie experimented with this recipe a lot to get it just right, so you may want to make a small test batch. :)

      Also, you could split this recipe into two and color both halves rather than making two batches. We recommend using our La Bomb Colorants for this recipe, as micas may not mix in well.

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

      La Bomb Colorants: http://www.brambleberry.com/Search.aspx?k=la+bomb

  42. Jessica says

    Hi-
    I just made a couple of batches of these, followed the recipe except changed color and fragrance oil. My first batch has started “weeping”…. that is little beads of liquid are forming on the outside of them, looks likes is is probably coming out of the inside. It is colored like the part of the bar it is coming from. I wiped it off, but I wondering if I should be concerned? Is this part of the drying process? I weighed everything out but my scale was being a touch fritzy so maybe I got too much of something but the consistency seems right…
    Thanks so much!
    Jessica

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Jessica!

      What kind of colorant did you use, and how much? Our La Bomb colorants are glycerin-based, and depending on how much you used, they may be sweating a little bit. This is especially the case in hot, humid climates.

      Let me know and we’ll get this figured out. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

      • Jessica says

        I used lab colors that were diluted as suggest on brambleberry….I didn’t measure just added til I got the color I wanted, so it could have been that but those are diluted in water so would they “sweat”? I may also have over done it on the fragrance a little (like I said my scale was being fritzy)…Could that do it? My second batch has not “oozed” or “sweated” so it must be something funky about my ratios. I guess mostly I am wondering if you think they will A) ever dry out properly and B) work ok….?

        • Kelsey says

          Hi Jessica!

          Too much color or fragrance can make these bars sweat a little. These may dry out with some time, and they are definitely OK to use. The baking soda and SLSA will make great bubbles. :)

          -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  43. Chloe Lude says

    Hi Guys,

    Just wondering if you have an issue with your bubble bars being too oily?

    I use pretty much the exact same recipe (converted to the metric system) and the bubble bars are coming out oily.

    Any help would be great.

    thanks

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Chloe!

      Depending on your climate and the level of humidity, these bars may be a little softer. If you’d like you can cut back on all the liquid ingredients slightly to see if that would help. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  44. desiree says

    Hello i need some help did some awsome soild bubble bath swirl came out followed recipe from the site but i let them dry over night and they have been sitting most of the day and they still feel like i just did them SUPER DOUGHIE…. any suggestion on how i can get them dry this s my first time doing the solid bubble bath :(

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Desiree!

      Depending on the heat and humidity in your area, this solid bubble bath can be a little soft. You might try cutting back on the liquid slightly to see if that dries it out for you. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  45. says

    hi!

    thank you so much for working on a bubble recipe! i have been dying to make bubble bars and got right to it.

    after i made a few batches and set them out they hardened within a week but i noticed after a couple of weeks they started to cry liquid from each bar. literally in small puddles underneath them and droplets formed on top of them.

    have you seen this happen and do you have an idea of what may have caused this so i can avoid it?

    thank you for any suggestions you may have!!

  46. XOXO says

    Tried to post this but it didn’t post so here goes one more time…. I would like to make these but where I live is so humid that I can’t use glycerin in any of my products because of it being a humectant and thus causing sweat and other problems that ruin my products. It also causes my bath bombs to “go off.” Can I substitute oils for the glycerin or something else? Will it still work right? What is the purpose of the glycerin, is it just to keep it together? If so, oil/melted butters should be fine to use as a sub right? If not, what would I need to sub the glycerin with? I do have a dehumidifier, but that didn’t keep the bbs from going off so I doubt very seriously it will help. Please answer because I have everybody and their mama asking for these jokers and I want to make them happy if I possibly can. Thanks for all your wonderful products and videos. I am a serious BB and SQ fan. I know much time and effort was put into coming up with this recipe and I’m thankful for it. I just sincerely hope something else can be subbed that won’t affect the end result. :(

  47. Katie says

    I am just getting into making my own bath products. I ordered SLS (not from Brambleberry :-() and it’s liquid. Is it supposed to be liquid? Can I still use the liquid? I will order from BB next time to get the dry, I’m just curious about liquid vs dry for this recipe.

    • Kelsey says

      Hi Katie!

      I’m not exactly sure! We didn’t test this recipe with liquid SLS, so I don’t know how it will act in this recipe. Because it’s liquid, it may make this recipe a lot softer.

      You may want to make a small test batch to see how it acts.

      You may also like our Teach Soap Forum. Other soapers can talk about their experiences, and some of them may have used liquid SLS. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

      Forum: teachsoap.com/forum

  48. Lindsay says

    I’ve been interested in making bubble bars, but was wondering about the supposed patent on bubble bars that is held by Lush.

    I’m not all that great at reading through legal jargon, but I was wondering if you guys had any insight about any problems that might come up if someone wanted to make these and also sell them?

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