Invigorating Foot Soak

This fizzy bath bomb foot soak is step one in our luxurious home pedicure routine. The soak contains 1st Distillation Peppermint Essential Oil, which leaves a pleasant cooling sensation on your feet, while the Epsom Salts are calming and soothing.

The Round Bath Bomb Clam Shell Mold acts as both the mold and the packaging for these little bombs, and you can complete the entire project by attaching the cute tag, which is available for free as a PDF download.

This project is part of the Happy Feet Home Pedicure series. See all the projects here: Moisturizing Heel Balm, Rose Clay Foot Mask, Cranberry Seed Foot Scrub and Summer Shimmer Nail Polish.

What You’ll Need:

4 Round Bath Bomb Clam Shell Molds
1 cup Baking Soda
½ cup Citric Acid
¼ cup Extra Fine Epsom Salt
1 Tbs. Chia Seed Oil
3 mL Peppermint Essential Oil, 1st Distillation

Free Home Pedicure Labels

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: In a large bowl, combine baking soda, citric acid and epsom salt and stir to combine.

TWO: Using your hands, break up any clumps. If you can’t get them all, you can sift your mixture through a strainer to break them up.


THREE: Add the chia seed oil and peppermint essential oil. Use your hands to combine the liquids with the powders breaking up any large clumps.


FOUR: Depending on the moisture level of the current mixture, spritz the bath bombs with witch hazel. It usually takes between 5-7 spritzes, and the mixture should be wet enough so when you squeeze the powder in your palm, it will stick together. If you don’t have witch hazel, adding a few extra drops of chia seed oil will also help the powders stick.

Note: You want to spray enough so that the powders stick together and aren’t crumbly. Be careful though because spraying too much can cause the mixture to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!


FIVE:
Firmly press this mixture into both halves of the bath bomb mold. Carefully remove any powder that fills the outer edges; doing so will make the bath bomb molds easier to close.


SIX: Mound a little extra mixture in the center of one half of the mold. Match the eyelets of each side up, and press together. To avoid any imperfections on your bath bomb, make sure to direct pressure to the edges of the mold rather than the center.

SEVEN: Continue filling until all the molds are full. Clean off any stray bits of fizzy ingredients, attach a label and you are done!

EIGHT: Unmold the fizzy when you are ready to use it (leaving your fizzies out in the air can often set off the fizzy reaction in humid climates). The bath bomb molds are intended for one time use, but if you are very careful when you unmold them you can re-use them. They are a mold & package all-in-one!

Like it? Share it!

Become an email subscriber

Enter your email address below and you will receive all our new posts directly in your email inbox.

27 Comments

      • Cheryl says

        I know this says: Invigorating Foot Soak … but can these also be used as a regular Bath Bomb? I have been trying to find a Bath Bomb recipe that uses Chia Seed Oil b/c I heard that alot of people in the Texas area where I am at says it helps their skin due to the humidity & heat. Please let me know & also can I add Kaolin Clay to this without messing up the recipe. If so how much can I add?

        • Kelsey says

          Hi Cheryl!

          You can absolutely use this as a regular bath bomb! We used it as a foot soak because it’s great for tired feet.

          Also, you can add kaolin clay to this recipe. I would recommend starting out with 1 tsp. and adding more if you like. If you notice this soak is on the dry side, you can add some more chia seed oil. :)

          -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  1. says

    I was wondering would it be OK to add a small amount of ground lavender buds or tea leaves for that extra “soakability”? I’m going to try it without but was curious as to what the folks at BB think. Thanks

  2. Karin says

    Those molds are brilliant! They are a bit harder to fill than I expected though–if I’m not filling it so firmly that the mixture gets pushed out the other side (thank you, curved bottom), I’m accidentally denting it when I smush the halves together! :p

    Eventually I prevailed, and I can’t wait to use these. :D I ended up with five of ‘em and a smidge left over, and that’s after one of them exploding over my table when I tried to gently pry it open (yeah, if you accidentally dent it, I suggest just leaving it–I’m gonna be sweeping up grit for days).

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *