Invigorating Foot Soak

  • Difficulty:Beginner
  • Time:30 minutes
  • Yields:4 bath bombs

This fizzy bath bomb foot soak is step one in our luxurious home pedicure routine. The soak contains 1st Distillation Peppermint Essential Oil, which leaves a pleasant cooling sensation on your feet, while the Epsom Salts are calming and soothing.

The Round Bath Bomb Clam Shell Mold acts as both the mold and the packaging for these little bombs, and you can complete the entire project by attaching the cute tag, which is available for free as a PDF download.

This project is part of the Happy Feet Home Pedicure series. See all the projects here: Moisturizing Heel Balm, Rose Clay Foot Mask, Cranberry Seed Foot Scrub and Summer Shimmer Nail Polish.

What You’ll Need:

4 Round Bath Bomb Clam Shell Molds
1 cup Baking Soda
½ cup Citric Acid
¼ cup Extra Fine Epsom Salt
1 Tbs. Chia Seed Oil
3 mL Peppermint Essential Oil, 1st Distillation

Free Home Pedicure Labels

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: In a large bowl, combine baking soda, citric acid and epsom salt and stir to combine.

TWO: Using your hands, break up any clumps. If you can’t get them all, you can sift your mixture through a strainer to break them up.


THREE: Add the chia seed oil and peppermint essential oil. Use your hands to combine the liquids with the powders breaking up any large clumps.


FOUR: Depending on the moisture level of the current mixture, spritz the bath bombs with witch hazel. It usually takes between 5-7 spritzes, and the mixture should be wet enough so when you squeeze the powder in your palm, it will stick together. If you don’t have witch hazel, adding a few extra drops of chia seed oil will also help the powders stick.

Note: You want to spray enough so that the powders stick together and aren’t crumbly. Be careful though because spraying too much can cause the mixture to fizz prematurely and ruin your bath bombs!


FIVE:
Firmly press this mixture into both halves of the bath bomb mold. Carefully remove any powder that fills the outer edges; doing so will make the bath bomb molds easier to close.


SIX: Mound a little extra mixture in the center of one half of the mold. Match the eyelets of each side up, and press together. To avoid any imperfections on your bath bomb, make sure to direct pressure to the edges of the mold rather than the center.

SEVEN: Continue filling until all the molds are full. Clean off any stray bits of fizzy ingredients, attach a label and you are done!

EIGHT: Unmold the fizzy when you are ready to use it (leaving your fizzies out in the air can often set off the fizzy reaction in humid climates). The bath bomb molds are intended for one time use, but if you are very careful when you unmold them you can re-use them. They are a mold & package all-in-one!

21 Responses to “Invigorating Foot Soak”

  1. Robin says:

    how many bath bombs will this one recipe make? Thanks.

  2. Lisa says:

    Can you substitute the chia seed oil with something else?

    • Amanda says:

      yeah. you can use whatever oil or butter you want. i use a mixture of coconut oil and shea butter.

    • Amanda says:

      Hi Lisa!

      Yes, you could definitely use a different oil if you’d like! We went with Chia Seed Oil because it is great for the skin :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  3. Jeanette says:

    This looks wonderful! Thank you.

  4. I am totally going to try this one!

  5. Diana says:

    I was wondering would it be OK to add a small amount of ground lavender buds or tea leaves for that extra “soakability”? I’m going to try it without but was curious as to what the folks at BB think. Thanks

    • Amanda says:

      Hi Diana!

      If you’d like, you could certainly add lavender buds or tea leaves! Just keep in mind that organic plant materials like those can go brown in your products eventually :)

      -Amanda with Bramble Berry

  6. Karin says:

    Those molds are brilliant! They are a bit harder to fill than I expected though–if I’m not filling it so firmly that the mixture gets pushed out the other side (thank you, curved bottom), I’m accidentally denting it when I smush the halves together! :p

    Eventually I prevailed, and I can’t wait to use these. :D I ended up with five of ‘em and a smidge left over, and that’s after one of them exploding over my table when I tried to gently pry it open (yeah, if you accidentally dent it, I suggest just leaving it–I’m gonna be sweeping up grit for days).

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Karin!

      I’m so glad you like these molds! Also, I’ve definitely made a mess with bath bombs before. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  7. Is there any good and cheaper alternatives to chia seed oil?

  8. sam says:

    Hi there,

    If you replace the Chia seed oil with Castor Oil will this leave the bath oily ? I have a customer who would like Castor Oil instead.? Thank you :)

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Sam!

      We didn’t test this recipe with Castor Oil, so I’m not 100% sure how it will act! However, I believe that wouldn’t be too oily in your recipe as long as you don’t use too much!

      You may want to try a small test batch to be sure. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  9. maggie says:

    could you use lavender Epsom salts instead?

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Maggie!

      We didn’t test this recipe with lavender epsom salts, but I believe that would be fine! You may want to make a small test batch to be sure. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

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