Save the Honey Bee Melt & Pour Soap

  • Difficulty:Intermediate
  • Time:1 Hour
  • Yields:Three 4.25 ounce Bars

The decline of the honey bee population, known as Colony Collapse Disorder, poses a serious threat to our ecosystem. Researchers estimate one-third of all honey bee colonies in the country have vanished. With a wide variety of agricultural crops pollinated by honey bees, the potential impact to our environment and economy is serious.

Unfortunately, the cause of the honey bee population decline remains a mystery. While theories have been posed, more research is crucial to identifying the cause. To aid research, Bramble Berry donates $3.50 for every Save the Honey Bee Mold sold to the UC Davis Honey Bee Research Fund.


As of July, more than $260 has been donated! Bramble Berry will continue to donate to the program every quarter. Not only are these molds supporting a great cause, they make an adorable bar of soap. Scented with Wildflower Honey Fragrance Oil, this project is a great way to get crafty while making a difference.

What You Need:
Save the Honey Bee Mold
Injector Soap Tool 
6.5 ounces White Melt and Pour Base
7.5 ounces Honey Melt and Pour Base
Yellow Oxide Color Block
Ultramarine Blue Color Block
Black Oxide Color Block
Chrome Green Color Block
4 mL Wildflower Honey Fragrance Oil
4 mL Vanilla Color Stabilizer

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!
ONE: Cut and melt 1 oz. of White Melt and Pour base in the microwave on 10 second bursts. Why 10 second bursts? When melting down such a small amount of melt and pour, it’s easy to burn. Using very short bursts helps reduce this. Add shavings of the Yellow Oxide Color Block and stir. Using the Injector Tool, fill in the beehive. Spray with isopropyl alcohol to disperse any bubbles, and clean the Injector Tool with hot soapy water.

Tip: The injector tool will become clogged with hardened soap if you don’t push it out immediately after you’re done. Keep a cup of hot water near by so you can rinse the tool with hot water and keep it from getting clogged in between uses.

TWO: Cut and melt .5 oz. of White Melt and Pour base in the microwave on 10 second bursts.  Add shavings of the Chrome Green Color Block and stir to incorporate. Using the Injector Tool, carefully fill in the leaf details. Spray with isopropyl alcohol to disperse any bubbles, and immediately clean the Injector Tool with hot soapy water.

THREE: Melt .5 ounces of Honey Melt and Pour Base in a heat-safe container on 5-10 second bursts. Add shavings of the Black Oxide Color Block and stir. Use the Injector Tool to carefully fill in the small bee details in the mold. Spray with isopropyl alcohol and immediately clean the Injector Tool with hot soapy water.

FOUR: Once all the details have hardened, cut and melt 3 oz. of White Melt and Pour base, and 3 oz. of Honey Melt and Pour Base. Add shavings of the Ultramarine Blue Color Block, and stir to incorporate. Stir in 2 mL of Wildflower Honey Fragrance Oil, and 2 mL of Vanilla Color Stabilizer. Because Wildflower Honey is a fragrance that discolors due to the vanillin content, Vanilla Color Stabilizer prevents discoloration. To learn more about vanilla discoloration, check out the “Why Did My Soap Turn Brown” blog post!
FIVE: Once the fragrance and color block are fully mixed in, spray the mold and small details with isopropyl alcohol. Spraying with isopropyl alcohol before pouring will help the blue layer adhere to the details. Pour the blue layer evenly into the three cavities, and spray with isopropyl alcohol to disperse any bubbles.

SIX: Allow the blue layer to harden. Cut and melt 4 oz. of White Melt and Pour base and 2 oz. of Honey Melt and Pour base. Add shavings of the Yellow Oxide Color Block and stir. Add 2 mL of Wildflower Honey Fragrance Oil, and 2 mL of the Vanilla Color Stabilizer. Stir to fully incorporate the fragrance. Spray blue layer with isopropyl alcohol, and pour the yellow layer on top. Spray with isopropyl alcohol to disperse any bubbles.
SEVEN: Allow your soap to fully harden. To release from the mold, use your palm to press firmly on the top in order to release the air lock and enjoy!

To package this adorable project, check out the Soap Queen Tv Packaging Episode! Packaging melt and pour is important in order to prevent glycerin dew.

11 Responses to “Save the Honey Bee Melt & Pour Soap”

  1. Monica says:

    Those are truly adorable and how wonderful of you to donate to such a worthy cause. Yet another great reason to make our purchases from you.

  2. Larissa says:

    Thanks for helping the bees & calling attention to the problem!

    For those who don’t do melt & pour (though that mold is freakin’ adorable and anyone who does melt & pour should get one), there are other ways to help the bees: Plant flowers, especially wildflowers, especially late-blooming ones. Provide a water source, in the form of shallow water for the bees to drink from. Avoid pesticides! Thanks again!

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Larissa!

      Thanks so much for those great tips. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

    • Barbara says:

      Planting late blooming flowers is so important. In CA where I live it is so dry every fall that the bees have to go into overdrive to find forage this time of year. Sunflowers, salvia, Crepe Myrtle trees, zinnias, goldenrod, and asters are good choices.

      And my personal soapbox…even the insecticides that are supposedly “bee friendly” are only safe for the bees if they are used when the bees are not on the plants. So that means that you usually have to spray at dusk as bees are early risers. The insecticides that are systemic have been banned in Europe and suspected as a major player in Colony Collapse Disorder. Insecticides need to be boldly labeled with information regarding bees and other beneficial insects.

  3. Brett says:

    This doesn’t have anything to do with this post but I don’t know where to find an answer for this. I was going to sell my soap making supplies. I just don’t have the time for it. Idk where to sell it though. On some forum u have to be a member for like 6 months and have made 10 posts to sell anything is there another way or place to do this. It’s mainly just some molds and fragrance oils

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Brett!

      I’m not sure of any specific forums where you might be able to sell your supplies. However, if you search “Soapmaking forums” online, quite a few options pop up!

      I’ve also heard of people selling their supplies on eBay. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

  4. Jennifer says:

    Thank you for saying how much you’re donating (and making it a significant amount). I hate when companies say, “A portion of proceeds…” without saying what portion. I appreciate your integrity.

  5. Barbara says:

    What a great mold. As a soap maker and bee keeper it really strikes a chord with me. I will be buying a mold and using it for my lotion bars. Sometimes I am able to sell honey and my soaps and lotions at the same events and this is a perfect way to tie them together and a great ice breaker to “preach” my save the bees campaign.

    Thank you for being a supporter of a worthy cause.

    • Kelsey says:

      Hi Barbara!

      So glad you like this mold! It sounds like a perfect way to combine your crafting with your beekeeping. :)

      -Kelsey with Bramble Berry

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