Soap Queen » Home Crafts http://www.soapqueen.com Tutorials on soapmaking, bath fizzies, lotions and more Wed, 22 Oct 2014 22:27:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Neroli & Shea Blossom Wax Tart Meltshttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/neroli-shea-blossom-wax-tart-melts/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/neroli-shea-blossom-wax-tart-melts/#comments Wed, 15 Oct 2014 22:06:07 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=41434 On a cold and rainy day, there is nothing better than filling your home with a warm scent. Wax tart melts are a fun alternative to candles and require no […]

The post Neroli & Shea Blossom Wax Tart Melts appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
On a cold and rainy day, there is nothing better than filling your home with a warm scent. Wax tart melts are a fun alternative to candles and require no open flame. Simply melt down wax, add your fragrance and color, and heat the tart on a warmer tray to release the fragrance. They’re easy to create and are a great project for beginners.


Neroli & Shea Blossom Fragrance Oil is a fantastic blend of bergamot, orange blossom and amber, making it a great choice for a home fragrance. It also blends beautifully with a wide variety of fragrances, including Smoky Patchouli and Vetyver Fragrance Oils. If you’d like more blending ideas for this project, check out this idea sheet!

What You’ll Need:
32 oz. Ecosoya Advanced Wax
2 oz. Neroli and Shea Blossom Fragrance Oil
Orange Wax Dye Block
10 Small Cubes Mold and Package, Plastic
Clean Up Tool

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!
ONE: In a heat safe container, measure 32 oz of Ecosoya Advanced Wax. Heat this in 30 second bursts in the microwave until completely liquid.

TWO: Add 2 oz of Neroli and Shea Blossom to the melted wax, and stir gently.
THREE: Now, add your colorant. Using the wide end of the soap clean up tool, scrape off shreds of the orange dye block. We used approximately 1 tsp of shreds to achieve our light orange color, but you can add more.
TIP: To check what color the final bars will be, run cold water or an ice cube over a spoon. Quickly dip the cold spoon into wax, and the solidified wax will be a good representation of the color of your final product.

FOUR: Pour the mixture into the small cubes molds, just below the brim. Let the molds set for at least 6 hours, or until fully hard.
TO USE: Break off a cube of your scented wax, and place it in the warmer tray. Let the fresh scent of a relaxing getaway fill your home.
What is your favorite type of fragrance to fill your home with? In addition to Neroli and Shea Blossom Fragrance Oil, I love Chai Tea Cybilla Fragrance Oil used in this Chai Tea Latte Candle project!

The post Neroli & Shea Blossom Wax Tart Melts appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/neroli-shea-blossom-wax-tart-melts/feed/ 8
Mica Paint & Glitter Pumpkins (3 Different Ways!)http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/mica-glitter-pumpkins-3-different-ways/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/mica-glitter-pumpkins-3-different-ways/#comments Sun, 12 Oct 2014 20:09:23 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=41327 One of my favorite things about Halloween is the decorating. Yes, candy and costumes are fun, but Halloween decorations means crafting! If you are throwing a Halloween party (or even […]

The post Mica Paint & Glitter Pumpkins (3 Different Ways!) appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
One of my favorite things about Halloween is the decorating. Yes, candy and costumes are fun, but Halloween decorations means crafting! If you are throwing a Halloween party (or even if you aren’t) these pumpkins covered in metallic glitter and mica really bring the wow factor. While they are not suitable for the outdoor elements, they make fantastic centerpieces and indoor flair.
Making these pumpkins is a ton of fun, and does not involve any sharp and dangerous tools. In fact, you probably have a large majority of the necessary supplies already! The mica painted pumpkins are a great rainy day project. If you are making the glitter pumpkin you may consider crafting outside or covering your work surface. The glitter can get a little messy =)

What You’ll Need (for all three pumpkins):
Gold Nail Polish Glitter
Silver Nail Polish Glitter
Heavy Gold Mica
Black Oxide Pigment
Luster Black Mica
99% Isopropyl Alcohol
Mod Podge
Masking/painters tape
Various paint brushes

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!
Let’s make some pumpkins! This post includes three different styles: mica painted polka dots, glitter stripes and a combo of the two. Of course you are not limited to these ideas, there are so many designs and colors that would work well. Some other ideas include chevron, spiderwebs, neon micas and various glitter colors!

Technique One: Mica Painted Polka Dots

ONE: To create the mica and oxide paint, mix equal parts mica or oxide with 99% isopropyl alcohol in a small container. If necessary, use a mini mixer to stir out the clumps. How much paint you need will depend on the size and quantity of your pumpkins, but a little goes a long way!
TWO: For this project, mix 1 tsp. Heavy Gold Mica, Black Oxide and Luster Black Mica with 1 tsp. 99% isopropyl alcohol. Fill a small container with alcohol to clean the brush in between colors. If necessary, wash off any dirt on the pumpkin and dry.
THREE: Begin drawing polka dots on the pumpkin. Because the paint is thin, do not put too much on your brush or it may drip.
FOUR: In between colors, dip the paint brush in a small amount of isopropyl or rubbing alcohol to clean the brush. Continue painting polka dots of various shades all over the pumpkin.
FIVE: Once happy with the design, spray the design with a thin layer of aerosol hairspray about 10 inches away from the pumpkin. Spraying with aerosol hairspray helps seal the paint, making it more resistant to smudging. It will not water proof the pumpkin.
TIP: Don’t spray too much hairspray, or the paint will begin to drip! Spraying the hairspray too close to the pumpkin can also lead to dripping. If this happens, use a wet paper towel or rag to clean up the drips, and touch up any smudged paint. 



Technique Two: Glitter Stripes

ONE: Rinse and dry your pumpkin. Using masking or painters tape, apply stripes of tape from the stem to the bottom until the entire pumpkin is covered. Applying the tape as even and straight as possible will lead to better results.
TIP: Place the pumpkin on top of newspaper or several small pieces of paper to aid in the cleanup.
TWO: Using a sturdy paint brush, apply Mod Podge glue to one section of pumpkin skin in between strips of tape.
THREE: Pour gold glitter onto the glue, allowing the glitter to fall onto the sheet of paper that the pumpkin is sitting on. Continue applying the gold glitter until the entire strip is covered. Pour the excess gold glitter back into the container.
FOUR: Repeat step three with silver glitter. Continue applying gold and silver glitter until the entire pumpkin is covered.
FIVE: Gently remove the tape strips. If necessary, clean up any glitter that got under the tape.
SIX: To prevent the glitter from falling off the pumpkin, spray the entire pumpkin with aerosol hairspray. Allow to dry, and apply another coat of hairspray.


Technique Three: Mica Dots & Glitter Stripes

ONE: Apply strips of masking or painters tape from the stem of the pumpkin, to the bottom of the pumpkin. Apply Mod Podge glue to every other section of pumpkin skin with glue. Pour silver glitter onto the glue, allowing the excess glitter to fall off.
TWO: Once every other taped section of pumpkin has been covered with silver glitter, gently remove the strips of tape.
THREE: Make mica/oxide paint using equal parts mica/oxide and 99% isopropyl alcohol or rubbing alcohol. Stir thoroughly to mix, and if necessary, use a mini mixer to remove any clumps. Begin painting dots of various sizes and colors in between the strips of silver glitter.
FOUR: Once you’re happy with the design, spray the entire pumpkin with aerosol hairspray. Do not spray too much or too close, or the mica painting may drip (see photo above). Allow to fully dry, and apply another coat of hairspray. Allow to dry and enjoy!

What is your favorite way to decorate pumpkins for Halloween? Of course, I’m a fan of basic carving too!

The post Mica Paint & Glitter Pumpkins (3 Different Ways!) appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/mica-glitter-pumpkins-3-different-ways/feed/ 12
Orange Blossom Candle Tutorial + Candle Tipshttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/candles-q/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/candles-q/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 05:19:22 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=21038 While candles are prominent in the fall and winter, when the correct fragrance is used candles are equally as enjoyable during summer. Using Orange Blossom Fragrance Oil, this candle project […]

The post Orange Blossom Candle Tutorial + Candle Tips appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
While candles are prominent in the fall and winter, when the correct fragrance is used candles are equally as enjoyable during summer. Using Orange Blossom Fragrance Oil, this candle project is perfect for adding fragrance and color to your home.

Need some tips for candle making? Below, I answer many common candle making questions. Covering everything from wick selection to frosting, your next candle project will be a breeze.

What You’ll Need:
16 oz. EcoSoya Advanced Soy Wax
Teal Wax Dye Block
Orange Wax Dye Block
Cd-16 Wicks (2 wicks)
.4 oz Orange Blossom (Candle and Soap) Fragrance Oil
8 oz Glass Bail Jars (2 jars)

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!
ONE: Shave off pieces of the Orange Wax Dye Block and Teal Wax Dye Block and set aside.

TWO: Melt 16 ounces of EcoSoya Advanced Soy Wax in the microwave on 30 second bursts. Once thoroughly melted, pour 8 ounces of wax into a separate container.

THREE: Add shavings of the Teal Wax Dye Block to one container of melted wax, and shavings of the Orange Wax Dye Block to the other container. Use a spoon to thoroughly mix the color. To test the color before pouring, use the “Frozen Spoon Trick.”

FOUR: Once you are happy with the colors, add .2 ounces of Orange Blossom Soap and Candle Fragrance Oil to each container. Stir to combine.
FIVE: Carefully pour 2 ounces of the blue wax into each 8 ounce bail jar. Place wick in the center, and use chopsticks, pencils or dowels to hold the wicks in place while the wax hardens.
SIX: Once the blue layer has cooled and hardened, pour 4 ounces of the orange wax into each glass bail jars. Pour the orange wax around 90 degrees to avoid it from melting the blue layer. At this point the orange wax may have cooled. Feel free to put it back into the microwave using 20 second bursts. Allow the orange layer to fully cool and harden.
Note: Dry time will vary depending on room temperature, but on average will take about 2 hours. 

SEVEN: Pour the remaining blue wax evenly into each glass bail jar, about 2 ounces for each jar. Allow to fully cool and harden.
EIGHT: Trim the wicks, and allow the candle to cure for 48 hours. This allows the fragrance to set up properly. Enjoy!

Q: Help! The top of my candle isn’t nice and smooth, what do I do?
Lumpy tops, divots or bumps your candles can be caused by too slow of a cooling process. You can fix this in a couple of different ways. Try increasing (or decreasing) your pour temperature in increments of +/- 10 degrees. Adjusting your ambient temperature and increasing air flow can also help prevent problems with your candles. Another way to remedy this problem is to grab a heat gun and aim it at those trouble spots from a 3-5 inch distance.

Q: I put fragrance in my candle, and now I can’t smell it!
We always recommend allowing your candles to sit (or cure) for at least 48 hours before burning to make sure the candle sets up properly. Another thing you want to make sure of, is that you are using fragrance that is compatible with your candle wax. Typically, adding in your fragrances above 135°F is going to give your candle a good hot throw. And, Bramble Berry has recently reformulated the candle fragrance line to use in candles, soap and lotions. Now you can make perfectly matching candle, soap and lotion ensembles; some the team’s favorites are Apple Macintosh and Pumpkin Pie.

Q: How much fragrance should I use in my candles?
When making container candles, we typically recommend using your fragrance choice at 4-6% of your entire candle weight. If you would rather work with actual numbers than percentages, hop on over to to the this blog post to learn how to to convert from %s to actual numbers.

Q: What do I use to color my candles?
Micas and oxides are great for soaping projects, but they don’t work as well in candles because they can clog the wick. Because pigments are heavy, they may fall to the bottom of the candle. The best colorants to use in candles are Wax Dye Blocks. Extremely concentrated and easy to mix in, one ounce of Wax Dye Blocks can color approximately 100 pounds of wax!

Q: What wick should I use for my candle?
When choosing a wick for your candle, it may seem that there are a million choices! Here is an easy chart that will help you decide:

Q: My candles are frosting, why?
Frosting on candles can occur when using soy or vegetable waxes and appears on the tops of candles as a white film or coating. Some factors that can affect the formation of frosting on your candles are fragrance, dye, pour temperature  cooling temperature and storage temperature. If you find that your candles are frosting, try increasing or decreasing the pour temperature by 10 to 30 degrees. While the candles cool, ensure the ambient room temperature remains fairly consistent. A room temperature of about 70 degrees is recommended.

Q: My candles are pulling away from the container, why?
If you find that there are gaps between the container and wax, this often occurs because of fluctuating temperatures that cause the wax to expand or condense. This problem is sometimes referred to as “wet spots.” Unfortunately once the candle pulls away from the container, it will not adhere again. If you find your candles separate from your containers, try increasing your pour temperatures or pouring into warm containers so that the wax and containers cool down at the same rate.

Have you made candles before? We would love to hear about your candle making experiences – and any tips I missed for the common candle problems.

The post Orange Blossom Candle Tutorial + Candle Tips appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/candles-q/feed/ 18
Garden Candle Tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/garden-candle-tutorial/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/garden-candle-tutorial/#comments Tue, 27 May 2014 21:13:18 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38334 April showers didn’t fail to deliver lots of May flowers. This clever Garden Candle is a fun way to bring the fresh scent of a spring garden inside. This candle […]

The post Garden Candle Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
April showers didn’t fail to deliver lots of May flowers. This clever Garden Candle is a fun way to bring the fresh scent of a spring garden inside. This candle features Sunny Herb Garden, which is May’s Sample of the Month. This fragrance performs wonderfully in cold process soap as it does not accelerate trace or discolor. It’s a sweet, floral scent, which makes it a great choice for fresh-smelling hair products or lotions.

And don’t forget, you can also use this project to participate in our Make It Month!

To participate, simple make a project using Sunny Herb Garden or Carnation Fragrance Oil. Then, post your photo on the Bramble Berry Facebook Page with the hashtag, ‘#BrambleGarden.’ We’ll post a collage of our favorite projects on the Soap Queen blog on June 9. Hurry, because the posting fun ends Friday, May 30. If you need a little inspiration, check out the photos that have already been posted here.

What You’ll Need:

20 oz Ecosoya Advanced Soy Wax

1 oz Sunny Herb Garden Fragrance Oil

4 Candle Pot Candle Containers

10 CD-12 Wicks

1 Orange Wax Dye Block

1 Hunter Green Wax Dye Block

1 Red Wax Dye Block

1 Dropper with Suction Bulb

1 Guest Botanicals Mold

1 Clean Up Tool

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: Melt 20 oz. of Ecosoya Advanced wax in a microwave safe container in 30 second bursts until clear.

TWO: Pour 4 oz. (volume measurement) of melted wax into smaller container.

THREE: Shave off a small pile of Hunter Green wax dye block, and put shavings into the 4 oz. of wax. To check the color, try the spoon trick: run cold water over a metal spoon, dry off, and quickly dip the tip of the spoon in your colored wax. This should give you an idea of what the green will look like when it is hardened.

FOUR: Once you are happy with the green, use your dropper to fill just the leaf section of the Guest Botanicals mold. Don’t fill this too full! You want just the leaf itself, not the rectangle part of the mold.

Tip: Wax that cools too rapidly can get a white haze on the surface. To prevent this haze on the leaves, fill a large flat container with hot water. Gently lay your leaf mold that has the wax in it, to float in this water. This will ensure your wax doesn’t cool too quickly.

FIVE: Shave off a pile of Orange and Red wax dye blocks. We used approximately 4 times the amount of orange to red. Add this to the large batch of uncolored wax, reheating it if necessary. Again, you can check the color of this wax using a cold metal spoon. Once you have a nice terra cotta color, measure out 1 oz. of Sunny Herb Garden Fragrance Oil. Add to colored wax and stir well.

SIX: Grab your flower pot containers and wicks. Using another dropper, place one drop of terra cotta wax in the center of a flower pot. Place a wick in this puddle of wax and hold it firmly until the wax sets up (about 10 seconds). Repeat for all four pots.

SEVEN: Fill flower pots almost to the brim with terra cotta wax. Use two pencils or chopsticks to hold wicks centered in the pot. Place each pot in a warm bath of water to help them to slowly cool.

EIGHT: Check on the green leaves. If they are solid, gently press on the back of the mold to release them. You will need three leaves per flower pot, so refill the leaves again, and repeat the water bath until you have 12 leaves total.

NINE: Once you have 12 leaves and all your terra cotta pots are set up, it is time to assemble the candles. Melt the remainder of the green wax. Using a dropper, dribble a little wax on top of the candle. Use this wax like glue to arrange three leaves around the top of each candle.

TEN: Trim wick to 1/2″, and your candle is ready to use! In case of waxy leaf dribbles, place your candle on a heat-safe surface so you can easily scrape away fallen wax. Our tests didn’t leak but just in case, protecting your surface is worth the extra step.

The post Garden Candle Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/garden-candle-tutorial/feed/ 4
Easy Elegant Coffee Filter Flowershttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/easy-elegant-coffee-filter-flowers/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/easy-elegant-coffee-filter-flowers/#comments Wed, 14 May 2014 20:10:32 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38066 Real flowers are beautiful, but sadly they can’t last forever. These coffee filter flowers (yes, those are coffee filters) not only look like the real thing, but they also have […]

The post Easy Elegant Coffee Filter Flowers appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
Real flowers are beautiful, but sadly they can’t last forever. These coffee filter flowers (yes, those are coffee filters) not only look like the real thing, but they also have a much longer shelf life! These filter “flowers” are incredibly easy to make, and you can dye them an infinite number of colors using a wide array of LabColors. Make a dozen of them for a bouquet, place setting or cute garland.

What You’ll Need:

Pinkberry Sherbert LabColor

Impatient Pink LabColor

Coffee Filters

Note: Because LabColors are highly concentrated and will stain the skin, gloves are recommended for this project. For information on how to dilute LabColors, check out this blog post.

ONE: In a small container, pour a small amount of dilute one part Pinkberry Sherbet LabColor to two parts distilled water. In a small separate container, dilute one part Impatient Pink LabColor to three parts water. For an explanation of working in parts, see this blog post.

 TWO: Grab the coffee filter by the center, and gently fold up to create a cone-like shape.

THREE: Gently place the ends of the coffee filter into the Impatient Pink LabColor, flip up, and allow the color to drip down and saturate the filter. Set aside on a paper towel. The color will continue to absorb and color the entire coffee filter. If you’d like more color, simply dip into the LabColor again.

FOUR: Repeat this process with all coffee filters. Once the Impatient Pink has saturated the filter, dip the very ends into the PinkBerry LabColor and set aside on the paper towel.

FIVE:  If you’d like to make some darker petals as well (this color is shown on the right in the above photo), dip the coffee filter into the Pinkberry LabColor and let the color saturate the entire filter Set aside on a paper towel, and let dry.

SIX: Once the filters are fully dried, lay two filters on top of the other, grab from the center to make a cone shape, and wrap the tape around to create a “stem” and hold the two layers together. We used decorative washi tape for an extra splash of fun.

Have fun crafting – and if you make something fun, we want to see it on our Facebook page or just tag us on Instagram! =)

The post Easy Elegant Coffee Filter Flowers appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/easy-elegant-coffee-filter-flowers/feed/ 4
Springtime Room Sprayhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/springtime-body-spray/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/springtime-body-spray/#comments Thu, 03 Apr 2014 18:00:44 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36331 Winter is on its way out, and spring cleaning is on its way in! Freshen up your home with this easy to make Springtime Room Spray. This spray takes less […]

The post Springtime Room Spray appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
Winter is on its way out, and spring cleaning is on its way in! Freshen up your home with this easy to make Springtime Room Spray. This spray takes less than 10 minutes to assemble. We experimented with all kinds of fragrance blends before arriving on the perfect combination of Spring Meadow and Crisp Apple Rose. It reminded us of freshly sprouted flowers on a warm sunny day.

What You’ll Need:

1.5 oz. Rose Water

.8 oz. Isopropyl Alcohol

.5 mL Optiphen ND

5.5 mL Polysorbate 20

Fragrance blend: 1 mL Spring Meadow Fragrance Oil and 1 mL Crisp Apple Rose Fragrance Oil

2 oz. Brushed Aluminum Bottle

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: Since you’re combining fragrance oils and water in this recipe, you need Polysorbate 20 to help combine the fragrance oil and the water.  Keep in mind that even though this room spray is not meant to go on the skin, to be on the safe side, use a skin safe fragrance – not a candle or potpourri fragrance. You never know what an end user will do with your product. =)

Combine the Polysorbate 20 and the fragrance oils first and mix well, making sure they are well mixed before adding the rose water. If your solution looks milky white, add a few more drops of Polysorbate. The mixture should be relatively clear (it’s okay if it looks a bit cloudy) before adding the additional ingredients.

TWO: Once the Polysorbate and fragrance oil mixture is clear, add the rose water.

THREE: Add the isopropyl alcohol.

FOUR: Add the Optiphen ND.

Pour the mixture into a 2 oz. Brushed Aluminum Bottle. This recipe makes once spray bottle, but feel free to double or triple it to make multiple bottles. The Polysorbate will help bind the Rose Water and fragrance oils, but give the bottle a good shake before each use for good measure. Please note that this solution does use preservative. If you do not use preservative, you run the risk of mold and bacteria growing in the solution.

Looking for more sprays or perfumes? Check out the tutorials below:

From left clockwise: How to Make Perfume video, Bug Away Spray Bouquet, White Ginger and Amber Perfume

The post Springtime Room Spray appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/springtime-body-spray/feed/ 15
Super Simple Boot Polishhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/super-simple-boot-polish/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/super-simple-boot-polish/#comments Wed, 29 Jan 2014 00:39:28 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=35319 We’re in the midst of winter, and your leather shoes may need a little TLC after sloshing around in the rain or snow. Boot and leather polishes can get quite […]

The post Super Simple Boot Polish appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
We’re in the midst of winter, and your leather shoes may need a little TLC after sloshing around in the rain or snow. Boot and leather polishes can get quite expensive, so we devised our own special recipe: a little olive oil mixed with a little beeswax acts as a great all around boot conditioner and water repellent. You can even add a pigment to revive dull or faded leather. Lay it on thick for maximum leather protecting power!

What You’ll Need:

1.1 oz. White Beeswax

2.8 oz. Olive Oil

Candle Tin

Optional: 1.5 tsp. of Brown Oxide or Black Oxide

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart! Please note that the kit includes the Brown and Black Oxide pigments, even though they are optional. If you don’t want them, you can remove them from your cart during checkout.

ONE: In a small heat-safe container, combine the olive oil and white beeswax. Be sure to use a small container that is proportional to the amount of liquid and wax. If there is too much extra room, the container can explode in the microwave.

TWO: Heat the mixture in the microwave on 30 second bursts. It took us 2 heating sessions to fully melt the mixture, but depending on the strength of your microwave it may vary. The container will be very hot, so be careful when you slowly pour it into the candle tin.

Give the mixture about 45 minute – 1 hour to fully harden. It’s ready to use right away! To use, take a damp washcloth and clean dirt and debris off the shoe before applying the balm. Then, use another washcloth to buff the balm into the shoe. The more the merrier, so don’t be afraid to apply it liberally!

Tinted Balm

If you’d like, you can easily tint the balm with either Brown or Black oxide. Although not necessary, the oxide does help to restore color to the boot.

ONE: To get the colorant to disperse throughout the mixture, you’ll need to micronize it first. To do that, simply blend the color in a food processor or coffee grinder to get it to a fine, powdery consistency. We recommend buying a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel bowl for easy cleaning.

TWO: Add the entirety of the colorant to the melted olive oil and wax mixture. We used a mini mixer to incorporate the color.

THREE: Just like with the untinted balm, give the mixture 45 minutes – 1 hour to harden. It’s ready to use right away!

The tinted polish really works! Check out the difference between these two boots. The boot on the right was polished with the tinted balm, the boot on the left was left untreated.

The post Super Simple Boot Polish appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/super-simple-boot-polish/feed/ 38
Homemade Holiday Snow Globehttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/homemade-holiday-snow-globe/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/homemade-holiday-snow-globe/#comments Tue, 24 Dec 2013 21:13:31 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=32802 If you’re not having a white Christmas this year, this cute little snow globe might be the next best thing. A fun decoration for your own home or a quick […]

The post Homemade Holiday Snow Globe appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
If you’re not having a white Christmas this year, this cute little snow globe might be the next best thing. A fun decoration for your own home or a quick gift idea, our Holiday Snow Globe is a simple and customizable project that is kid friendly and easy to whip up at the last minute. For the example project we used our Penguin Erasers, but you could use any embeddable toys (how fun would a snowy unicorn or cute koala be, for example)? Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!

What You’ll Need:

8 oz. Tall Plastic Bail Jar
1/2 tablespoon Liquid Glycerin
Iridescent Glitter
2 Penguin Erasers
Water

Optional Additions:
Plastic Cap (to use as a riser in the lid)
Waterproof Glue (100% silicone glue for kitchen & bathroom or super glue gel both work well)
Fun accessories like Sea Glass or Holiday Buttons

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: Glue the plastic cap to the underside of the lid of the bail jar. This will allow the contents of your snow globe to stand up a bit higher so they are more visible.

TWO: Apply glue to the sea glass and attach it to the plastic cap on the lid of the bail jar.

THREE: Glue the penguins to the sea glass. Tip: pay attention to where the clasp of the lid is. Position your penguins (or embeddables) so they won’t be blocked when you seal the jar.

FOUR: Glue the presents or other goodies to the penguins.

FIVE: Place areas of glue on the base and sprinkle glitter on these areas creating a sparkling snow effect all around your characters.

SIX: Check to ensure all components on the lid will clear the mouth of the bail jar then set aside and let glue set according to the instructions.

SEVEN: Once your glue has dried entirely add water to the jar until it is almost full, then add about 1/8 teaspoon of glitter.

EIGHT: Add 1/2 tablespoon of Glycerin to the water and stir well to full incorporate it into the water.

NINE: Holding the jar over a sink, carefully close and seal your bail jar. Displaced water may squirt out the sides.The ultimate goal is to get as much water in the snow globe as possible with the lowest amount of air bubbles.

TEN: Turn it over and check the seal. If it leaks, then the seal is probably not aligned with the lip of the bail jar. Try opening it again and straightening out the seal. Once sealed, flip the jar over, shake thoroughly and voilà! You have your very own winter wonderland!

Glitter makes everything better … Happy Holidays!

The post Homemade Holiday Snow Globe appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/homemade-holiday-snow-globe/feed/ 7
Fancy Pants – A Soap Queen sewing tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/fancy-pants-soap-queen-sewing-tutorial/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/fancy-pants-soap-queen-sewing-tutorial/#comments Tue, 17 Dec 2013 20:18:32 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=32298 Pants! I was excited to do a fun sewing project that the kids could actually wear.  I’ve been trying to learn how to sew all year and sharing those projects […]

The post Fancy Pants – A Soap Queen sewing tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
Pants! I was excited to do a fun sewing project that the kids could actually wear.  I’ve been trying to learn how to sew all year and sharing those projects with you as I (slowly) learn  (see: A Givember Sewing Project, Soothing Eye Pillow Sewing Tutorial, Handmade Pin Cushion with Walnut Seeds).

Pants seemed intimidating, but your basic pant for the littles actually come together pretty quickly when you have a good pattern and a few hours. A great (and free!) pattern for newborn pants can be found here and a pattern for older kids can be found here. Etsy also has a good selection of pants patterns that are available both pre-printed and as digital downloads that you print yourself.

Typically the patterns will come with their own instructions, but here’s a (very!) basic pant-making tutorial from a beginner’s perspective. I made pants for both Lily and Jamisen, so you’ll see two different colors of fabric in the pictures.


What You’ll Need:

Fabric (Note: your pattern will tell you the amount of fabric needed and the type of fabric that is recommended; I used a cotton seersucker but a quilting-weight cotton or even flannel would work! Can you say cozy flannel jammies?)

Elastic (Note: again, your pattern will tell you the type, width and amount needed.)

Pattern

Scissors or Rotary Cutter and Cutting Mat

Sewing Machine

Straight Pins

Chalk in a contrasting color

Iron and Ironing Board

Optional: Pattern Weights

Fabric Prep: If needed (if you are working with a cotton fabric), pre-shrink your fabric by washing on a normal cycle and drying. Iron the fabric once it’s dry. This will prevent your perfect pants from becoming capris before their time. (Note: there is no pre-shrinking cycle for kidlet growth spurts!)

ONE: If using a digital pattern, print the pattern and assemble according to the pattern’s instructions. Lay out your fabric folded down the center parallel to the selvedge with the rights sides together (so the side of the fabric that will be on the inside of the pants is facing out). Note: the selvedge is the machine-treated edge of the fabric. The fabric is cut from the bolt perpendicular to the selvedge.

TWO: Lay out your pattern in a way that fits the folded fabric. Many patterns have a layout diagram to help you fit everything on the fabric. Pay attention to any pieces that need to be placed on the fold. Use pattern weights or other heavy objects to anchor the pattern and trace the pattern with chalk. Carefully remove the patterns and weights, and pin the fabric just inside your traced line with the pin perpendicular to the traced line at sporadic points in order to keep the two layers together. If it’s helpful, label each pattern piece with it’s name written on a piece of tape.

THREE: Let’s take a second to talk about the pattern pieces. Pants patterns look pretty weird, huh? And depending on where you got your pattern, they may vary in the amount of actual pieces that they come in. The basic anatomy of a pants pattern:

-The center or crotch seam is the shorter of the two odd, curved seams that can vary in shape from a slight curve to almost half of a letter U, depending on the fit of the pant. The center seam starts at the waist and ends at the top of the inseam. The more drastic the curve at the center seam, the more fitted the pant. There is a difference between the pants front curve and the pants back curve. I’m sure you can guess why. Most patterns will be labeled as “front” and “back”, but if you’re unsure, the back curve is more pronounced than the front. Baby got back! (There are always exceptions – especially with baby patterns where fit isn’t as body-conscious, there may be just one piece that acts as both front and back.)

-The inseam is the longer of the two curved seams, and is the seam that runs along the inside of the leg. The inseam starts at the end of the center seam and ends at the hem. The more drastic the curve at the center seam, the more the inseam has to curve to meet it. The inseam ends at the hem of the pant, and depending on the pant either ends at a square (for a straight leg), tapers in (for a skinny or tapered leg), or curves out (for a boot cut leg).

-The outseam is the straight (mostly) seam on the pattern. This will be the seam that runs on the outside of the leg, where pockets typically are. The outseam starts at the waist and ends at the hem. The outseam can be curved at the hip to help with the fit of the pant, and can have the same leg shape variations as the inseam depending on the type of pant. Not every pant pattern has an outseam – if there is no need for shaping or curving, then your pattern may have directed you to place this edge on the fold. One less seam to stitch – yay!

FOUR: Whew, let’s start sewing! First, start with the center seam. Match the front center seams, with the right side of the fabric together, and sew using your pattern’s seam allowance. Repeat with the back center seams. Finish the raw edges with a serger or a zig-zag stitch in the seam allowance. Press the seam as you sewed it, then with the seam allowance to the left.

FIVE: Open up the pieces along the seams, and match the front to the back at the inseam. Sew the inseam using your pattern’s seam allowance,matching the center seam. Finish the raw edges with a serger or a zig-zag stitch in the seam allowance. Press the seam as you sewed it.

SIX: Match up your outseams and sew according to your pattern’s seam allowance. Finish the raw edges with a serger or a zig-zag stitch in the seam allowance. Press the seam as you sewed it. If your outseam was cut on the fold, skip this step!

SEVEN: At this point, you’ll want to create an enclosed casing for the waistband elastic. “Casing” is a fancy term for the tunnel that will house the elastic. The width of the waistband is determined by the width of the elastic that your pattern calls for, but a good rule of thumb is the elastic width + 1/2 inch. Fold down the fabric at the waist toward the inside of the pant by 1/4 inch and press, then fold again by the width of your elastic + 1/4 inch and press. Stitch along the double-folded edge (not the top of the waistband), back-tacking at the beginning and end of the seam and leaving a 1 inch hole.

EIGHT: Get a rough measurement around your youngster’s waist. The elastic should be about 25% less than a loose waist measurement. Cut your elastic to size and attach a safety pin to one side. Insert the safety pin into the hole in your waistband and use it to feed the elastic through to the other side. Be sure not to lose the tail in the casing! Remove the safety pin. Give yourself some slack by pulling out about 2 or so inches of either end of the elastic, and sew the elastic along the short side to create an enclosed circle. Allow the elastic to retreat back into the casing and close the hole with a topstitch.

NINE: Try the pants on their recipient and mark the hem length with chalk (it will brush off easily enough!). Measure 1.5 inches from the mark toward the raw edge of the fabric, and cut off the excess. Fold each of the hems 1/2 inch toward the inside of the pant and press. Fold the hem again, 1 inch toward the inside of the pant and press. Stitch along the folded edge inside the pant (not at the bottom of the hem). Ta-da! Pants! Note: your pattern may have a designated amount of hem allowance. This is a general hemming technique; follow your pattern if it specifies.

OPTIONAL FLAIR: For Miss Lily, I made a simple embellishment for her little onesie. I free-cut a few circles out of the pink seersucker and, leaving the edges raw, I freestyle-sewed all around until they were in place. Super cute, and quick!

And there you have it! Cute pants to match a very cute kid =)

The post Fancy Pants – A Soap Queen sewing tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/fancy-pants-soap-queen-sewing-tutorial/feed/ 6
Sunday Night Spotlight: EcoSoya Advanced Waxhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/sunday-night-spotlight-ecosoya-advanced-wax/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/sunday-night-spotlight-ecosoya-advanced-wax/#comments Mon, 16 Dec 2013 05:35:08 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=34282 Now that it’s winter time, there’s nothing better than cozying up in your favorite chair with a good book, a hot cup of tea and a richly scented candle with […]

The post Sunday Night Spotlight: EcoSoya Advanced Wax appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
Now that it’s winter time, there’s nothing better than cozying up in your favorite chair with a good book, a hot cup of tea and a richly scented candle with a softly flickering flame (and for me, that only happen during the kiddo’s nap time and I love that quiet time!). Bramble Berry offers a number of excellent waxes so you can make your own candles, and lately our favorite has been the EcoSoya Advanced Wax. It’s 100% vegetable based and sourced from soy beans grown exclusively by domestic farmers. Best of all, it has multiple uses: this wax is lip and skin safe, making it an potential replacement for beeswax in lip balm recipes.

This particular wax is specially designed for containers, and could be paired with our 14 oz. Round Glass Candle Jar, Flower Pot Candle Container or the 10 oz. Tapered Neck Candle Jar.

When deciding how much candle wax you’ll need for a given container, remember that it’s important to measure your wax by weight and not volume. Wax takes up much more space by volume, so if you measure that way you’ll find that you’ll cut yourself quite short when you go to melt and pour! You can read more about why we always recommend measuring by weight instead of volume here and here.

We measured out 16 oz. of Palm Stearic Acid by volume (left) and then melted it down (right). You can see that this would not be nearly enough wax to fill a 16 oz. container!

There are many options for scenting candles. We have an entire category of fragrances formulated specifically for candle use, but the reality is you can use any of our fragrance or essential oils for candle making. We highly recommend doing a test candle/burn test when experimenting with fragrance or essential oils because the scent can drastically change when burned, or effect how the candle burns.

We recommend a starting point of .5 oz. per pound of wax if you’re using essential oils or 1 oz. per pound if you’re using fragrance oils. Keep in mind, that’s just a starting point and you may prefer a stronger or weaker scent. Test batches for throw (scent strength) are your friend.

As far as colorants, there are a wide range of wax dye blocks that make candle coloring super easy. They work the same as our color blocks for melt and pour in that they are highly concentrated colorants dispersed in sold wax. To use them, simply shave off chunks of the dye block into your melt wax, stir, and then pour! We colored the candles above using the dye blocks.

Choosing a candle wick can be quite a complicated process (who would have thought?) but here is a chart that breaks down the most common wicks and what size candles they’re best fo:

Wick Model# and CharacteristicsRRD 29CD-12CD-16CD-20
Use: Small Containers and PillarsX
Use: Medium Containers and PillarsXXX
For candle diameter:1-2″2.5-3″2.75-3.25″3.5-4″
Wax Pool (diameter):1.8″1.93″2.01″2.06″
Flame Height:1.1″2.39″2.54″3.28″

 

Wick Model# and CharacteristicsWU-150WU-250WU-350WU-450
Use: Small Containers and Pillars
Use: Medium Containers and PillarsXXXX
For candle diameter:4-5″4-4.5″4″3.5-4″
Wax Pool (diameter):3.5″3.32″3.28″3.09″
Flame Height:2.40″2.24″1.78″1.41″

Click here to see our entire selection of wicks or learn more about each.

Below are a variety of projects to get you inspired. We’ve done tutorials on super cute wax tarts made for oil burners, ombre candles and even candles with whipped wax!

Top: Simple Wax Tarts, Homspa Ombre Candle

Bottom: Chai Tea Latte Candle, Whipped Frosting Candle

What are some of your favorite wintertime candle scents? Got any questions about Soy Wax? Ask them below.

The post Sunday Night Spotlight: EcoSoya Advanced Wax appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/home-crafts/sunday-night-spotlight-ecosoya-advanced-wax/feed/ 7