Soap Queen » Cold Process Soap http://www.soapqueen.com Tutorials on soapmaking, bath fizzies, lotions and more Thu, 24 Apr 2014 03:08:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Havana Classic: Neptune Column Pour + free templatehttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/havana-classic-starfish-column-pour/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/havana-classic-starfish-column-pour/#comments Tue, 25 Mar 2014 20:38:59 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36252 The Havana Classic series wraps up this week with one final tutorial — the Neptune Column Pour. Typically this look is achieved by pouring the soap batter over a weighed […]

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The Havana Classic series wraps up this week with one final tutorial — the Neptune Column Pour. Typically this look is achieved by pouring the soap batter over a weighed column shape. Check out page 74 in the Soap Crafting book for an example of this technique. In this project, we put a little twist on the traditional column. Instead of a 4-point rectangle shown in the Soap Crafting book, we poured over a 5-point star, resulting a beautiful and unique pattern. The star template is included for free in this tutorial.

Tomorrow is the last day of the Havana Classic series, and don’t forget that all of our original silicone molds are 30% off until Wednesday, March 26 at 12 noon PST. Enter coupon code HAVAMOLD during checkout to get in on the deals!

What You’ll Need:

9.9 oz. Avocado Oil

3.3 oz. Cocoa Butter

13.2 oz. Coconut Oil

6.6 oz. Mango Butter

19.8 oz. Olive Oil

13.2 oz. Palm Oil

9 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

21.7 oz. distilled water

Ultramarine Blue

Hydrated Chrome Green

Titanium Dioxide

Yellow Oxide

Brick Red Oxide

Tangerine Wow

4 oz. Tobacco and Bay Leaf Fragrance Oil

Free 5-Pointed Star Column Template

18 Bar Birchwood Mold with Silicone Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLORANT PREP: The colors in this project are special blends. Prepare them ahead of time in the following ratios. We recommend dispersing colorants in liquid oils, such as Sweet Almond or Sunflower oil:

  • Dark Blue: 1/2 teaspoon Ultramarine Blue + 1/2 teaspoon Hydrated Chrome Green dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • Aqua: 1 teaspoon Titanium Dioxide + 1/2 teaspoon Hydrated Chrome Green dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • White: 1 tablespoon Titanium Dioxide dispersed in 2 tablespoons liquid oil.
  • Yellow: 1 teaspoon Yellow Oxide dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • Red: 1/4 teaspoon Brick Red Oxide + 1 teaspoon Tangerine Wow dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.

For more on preparing colorants for cold process soaping, check out this SQTV Short.

TOOL PREP:

You will need to create two star-shaped columns for this design. We made ours out of cardboard but you can use whatever you have on hand.

ONE: Cut out the template along the solid lines. Place the large rectangles over your cardboard and cut the cardboard to size along the edges using a craft knife.

TWO: Use a pen or pencil and mark out the dashed lines on your cardboard. These lines indicate the mountains and valleys which will result in an accordion shape and form the body of the column. Mark the A’s and B’s on your cardboard as well. These will indicate the edges you need to tape together in later steps.

THREE: Place a ruler between the marks and use a craft knife to score your cardboard along the ruler. You will score one side of the cardboard for one set of dotted lines and the other side of the cardboard for the other set of lines. This will ensure that you are able to fold your cardboard correctly creating the accordion shape you see in the photo below.

From top left — Step 1: Cutting the paper to the template size. Step 2: The cut out pieces. Step 3: Marking the cut outs along the lines of the template. Step 4: Scoring the cut out along the lines, connecting the marks made in Step 3. Step 5: The accordion-folded cut out. Remember to score each line on the opposite side so you can fold the paper into an accordion shape. Step 6: Tape the sides with the same corresponding letter together.

FOUR: Lay both of your cardboard accordions down and line up the edges marked with an A. These should rise to a ridge. Tape these two pieces together along this ridge. This will be the bottom part of your star between the two bottom legs.

FIVE: Join the two edges marked with B together and again tape along the ridge. At this point you should be able to shape your two accordion pieces into the shape of a 5-pointed star. To ensure they hold shape tape one of the star-shaped end caps on one end of the tube.

SIX: Now you should have an open ended column in the general shape of a 5-pointed star. Fill this column with some sort of weight. We used small rocks, but you can use anything that will help hold the column down so the soap does not pick it up and move it. Make sure your column retains its five-pointed shape while filling it.

SEVEN: Once your column is filled, tape the other end cap on. We taped one point at a time and once the first two were taped we found it easier to lay the column on its side and rotate it through the remaining points. This helped the column keep its shape since we used a relatively lightweight cardboard. If you are using a heavier cardboard this likely won’t be a concern. Ensure both end caps are secure and now your star columns are ready for your mold.

Top left — Step 7: Taping the sides with corresponding letters together. Step 8: Taping the open side together. Step 9: Your star is starting to take shape. Step 10: Cutting out the star-shaped end pieces. Step 11: Taping the end pieces to the column. Step 12: Don’t forget to fill your column with something heavy before sealing it shut!

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Avocado, Cocoa Butter, Mango Butter, Coconut, Olive and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace.

THREE: Once the batter has reached light trace, split it equally into five containers.

FOUR: Add the dispersed colorant mixtures. Whisk in one color per container in the following amounts:

  • 2 teaspoons dispersed Yellow + 1/4 teaspoon dispersed White
  • 1.5 teaspoons dispersed Red
  • 3 teaspoons dispersed White
  • 2 teaspoons dispersed Dark Blue
  • 3 teaspoons dispersed Aqua

FIVE: Divide the fragrance equally among the five containers. Incorporate with a wire whisk.

SIX: Pour a tiny amount (about 1/8 of the bottle) of White soap in a squeeze bottle. This is for any final embellishment after you pour the design. Set aside.

SEVEN: Decide on a color order and stick with it for the entirety of the pour. Then pour the first color in the center of the star column while counting to 3. Repeat this step with the other colors, again counting to three. Repeat the process until the containers have been emptied.

EIGHT: When the containers are empty, slowly remove the column from the soap. Have a container waiting near by to set the column in.

NINE: Using the squeeze bottle you poured in step six, embellish the area where the column was removed. We made small dots to make the soap look like flowers.

Spray with isopopyl alcohol and then insulate the soap and place on a heating pad for 15 – 20 minutes. Then remove from heat and cover it overnight. Allow the soap to cure for 4 – 6 weeks and then enjoy!

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Honey Bee Soap Tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/honey/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/honey/#comments Wed, 19 Mar 2014 20:43:06 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=35786 The first day of spring is tomorrow, and that means sunnier days, sprouting flower and Soap Gatherings! The Central Soapers will host this year’s first Soap Gathering. If you aren’t […]

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The first day of spring is tomorrow, and that means sunnier days, sprouting flower and Soap Gatherings! The Central Soapers will host this year’s first Soap Gathering. If you aren’t familiar, soap gatherings are mini conferences held by soapers across the country. Many of the gatherings feature workshops and speakers. Best of all, they’re organized by members of our own soaping community.

The Central Soapers workshop is spearheaded (with lots of help from other soapers) by Kenna of Modern Soapmaking, and takes place March 22 – 23 in Overland Park, Kansas. Bramble Berry is a proud sponsor of many soap gatherings, and this year we’re sending the mold & ingredients to make this Honey Bee CP soap as a raffle prize. Scented with Wildflower Honey, it features four natural colorants including Yellow Silt Clay, Purple Brazilian ClayDark Red Brazilian Clay and Activated Charcoal. You can still make this lovely soap even if you can’t attend the gathering!

What You’ll Need:

8.3 oz. Coconut Oil

1.7 oz. Mango Butter

9.9 oz. Olive Oil

8.3 oz. Palm Oil

5 oz. Sweet Almond Oil

4.6 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

10.9 oz. distilled water

Yellow Silt Clay

Purple Brazilian Clay

Dark Red Brazilian Clay

Activated Charcoal

2 oz. Wildflower Honey Fragrance Oi

Comb Swirl Tool

9 Bar Birchwood Mold with Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of each colorant into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get clumps worked out smoothly. The clays tend to sink to the bottom of the container, so be sure to give them one final mix right before you add them into the batter.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water. Gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Coconut, Mango, Olive, Sweet Almond and Palm Oils (remember to fully melt, then mix, your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils. Stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

THREE: After the batter has reached a light trace, split it equally into four containers.

FOUR: Add the dispersed colorants to the containers in the following measurements:

  • the entire container of dispersed Yellow Silt Clay (3 teaspoons)

  • ½ teaspoon dispersed Red Brazilian Clay

  • the entire container of dispersed Purple Brazilian Clay (3 teaspoons)

  • ½ teaspoon dispersed Activated Charcoal

Stir in with a wire whisk or spoon.

FIVE: After you’ve fully incorporated the color, fill ⅛ of each squirt bottle with a single color. Set them aside until step eight.

SIX: Now add the fragrance oil to the cups of batter. Split the fragrance oil equally between the four cups — eyeballing is okay!

SEVEN: Pour the batter in a zigzag pattern across the mold. Layer the colors one on top of the other, in the same order, until you’ve emptied the containers.

EIGHT: Get the squirt bottles from step five. Pour thin, horizontal lines across the length of the mold until you reach the other side. Repeat this process with the other colors, methodically layering one on top of the other in the same order and pattern. Do this until you’ve emptied all the colored squirt bottles.

NINE: Finish the design by running the Comb Swirl Tool down the length of the mold.

TEN: Spray the entire top with 91 or 99% Isopropyl Alcohol to reduce soda ash. Cover and insulate for 24 hours. Unmold after 3-4 days. Allow to cure 4-6 weeks. Enjoy!

Bonus!: Check out this Instagram video for the making of this soap!

 

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Natural Colorant Taiwan Swirlhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/taiwan-swirl/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/taiwan-swirl/#comments Thu, 13 Mar 2014 23:29:14 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36470 This beautiful technique is called the ‘Taiwan Swirl’ because of the first YouTube video that showcased this style of soapmaking. The most difficult part of this recipe is keeping the […]

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This beautiful technique is called the ‘Taiwan Swirl’ because of the first YouTube video that showcased this style of soapmaking. The most difficult part of this recipe is keeping the batter at a light enough trace to get wispy lines. You can change the look of the design by changing the size of the dowel/chopstick/skewer or swirling tool. This recipe used a larger tool and a thin to medium trace to achieve the final product.

Bonus! The new Multi-Pour Sectioning Tool makes it a breeze to separate the 4 colors in this recipe that create the unique design. Scroll down to step 7 to see how to use the dividers.

What You’ll Need:

3.5 oz. Cocoa Butter

8.7 oz. Coconut Oil

10.5 oz. Olive Oil

5.2 oz. Palm Oil

7 oz. Rice Bran Oil

4.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

11.5 oz. distilled water

Dark Red Brazilian Clay

Indigo Powder

Activated Charcoal

Titanium Dioxide

Essential Oil Blend: 1.5 oz. Litsea Essential Oil and .6 oz. Spearmint Essential Oil

10″ Silicone Loaf Mold

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of each colorant into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get clumps worked out smoothly. Prepping your colors in the beginning will allow you to work quickly and give you more time to work with your soap.

FRAGRANCE PREP: Combine the Litsea and Spearmint essential oils in a glass container and set aside until step 3.

MOLD PREP: Using cardboard, cut three dividers that fit snugly down the center (lengthwise) of the mold. Cardboard brackets on either end can help with stability. If you don’t want to use cardboard, Bramble Berry has a retrofit divider set here for the classic sliding bottom 5 pound mold.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Cocoa Butter, Coconut Oil, Olive Oil, Rice Bran Oil and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.


THREE: When the batter reaches light trace, add the essential oil blend. The Litsea Essential Oil will breakdown the trace, so be sure the batter is fully emulsified before moving on. You may need to stick blend for 10 – 20 seconds.

FOUR: Split the batter evenly into four contains. No need to be exact, but each container should hold about 11 – 12 ounces.

FIVE: Add the dispersed colorants at the following rates:

Stir in the colorants with a wire whisk or spoon.

Quick note: We used cardboard dividers here, but for ease of use the new Multi-Pour Sectioning Tool can’t be beat! This sectioning tool set is perfectly fitted for our 5 Pound Wood Mold with Sliding Bottom. It divides your 5 pound soap loaf into either 3 or 4 sections. Keep in mind it only fits the 5 lb. Wood Mold, so it’s too big for this tutorial. If you want to try the dividers in the bigger mold, simply resize the recipe with the Lye Calculator and set the dividers into the mold.

SEVEN: For now we’ll stick with the cardboard, and for this part you may need to grab a friend. Make sure your center pieces of cardboard are stable and then get someone to help you simultaneously pour the colored batters. Tamp the mold on the table several times once all the soap has been poured, and then slowly lift the cardboard straight up and out of the mold.

EIGHT: Insert a chopstick or dowel down to the bottom of the mold. Then, move it back and forth horizontally through the soap, working your way up the mold.

NINE: Repeat this process, except this time move the dowel up and down vertically.

Allow the soap to sit in the mold for 24-48 hours. When it’s time to cut, you can cut the loaf in the traditional way, but I find that the swirls really shine when I cut the bars horizontally. If you’re not sure how to cut bars horizontally, there’s a video for that here. Cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

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Shamrock Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/shamrock-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/shamrock-cold-process/#comments Fri, 07 Mar 2014 00:30:19 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36426 Don’t be caught without your green this St. Patty’s Day! This cold process soap recipe features clean green and yellow soap layers enhanced by a cute Four Leaf Clover Stamp. […]

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Don’t be caught without your green this St. Patty’s Day! This cold process soap recipe features clean green and yellow soap layers enhanced by a cute Four Leaf Clover Stamp. Embellish with a little gold sparkle mica and you’ve got a bar of soap fit for a leprechaun’s pot of gold.

What You’ll Need:

12.2 oz. Olive Oil

10.5 oz. Canola Oil

8.7 oz. Rice Bran Oil

1.7 oz. Castor Oil

1.7 oz. Cocoa Butter

4.4 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

11.5 oz. distilled water

Green Chrome Oxide

Titanium Dioxide

Sparkle Gold Mica

2 oz. Raspberry Porter Fragrance Oil

10″ Silicone Loaf Mold

Four Leaf Clover Soap Stamp

Isopropyl Alcohol

Dropper

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of Chrome Green pigment and 1 teaspoon of Titanium Dioxide into 2 tablespoon of liquid oil each (we like Sweet Almond or Sunflower).

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water, and stir until clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that lasts longer in the shower, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

TWO: Melt and combine the Canola, Castor, Cocoa Butter, Olive and Rice Bran oils in a large glass container. Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace.

THREE: Pour off about 2 cups (16 oz.) into two separate containers. Each container should hold about 8 oz. of soap each. Add ½ teaspoon of dispersed Chrome Green Pigment to each container.


FOUR: Add about one-third of the fragrance to the batter (estimating is okay). Mix in with a wire whisk or spoon.

FIVE: Because this is a palm-free recipe, it will take longer to reach a thick trace. Achieving thick trace is important in this recipe tp keep the different colors of the layers separate. Using a stick blender, blend one container of green batter for 1 – 3 minutes until it reaches the consistency of pudding.

SIX: Slowly pour the green soap into the mold until you have a layer that is approximately 1/2″ deep across the bottom.

SEVEN: Add another one-third of the fragrance oil to the uncolored soap and stick blend to fully incorporate the fragrance. Add 3 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide, sticking blending again to reach a thick trace.

EIGHT: Slowly pour the white soap into the mold. You may want to pour over a spoon or spatula to ensure that the layers don’t swirl and mix together. Concentrate your pouring down the center of the mold to create the curve in the first layer of green The concept here is to create a thicker white layer on top of the green since that is where you will apply your soap stamp once your soap has set up and is unmolded.

NINE: Add remaining one-third of the fragrance oil to the remaining container of green soap. Stick blend until the batter reaches the consistency of pudding (thick trace).

TEN: Gently pour the green soap on top of  the uncolored soap. You may want to pour over a spoon or spatula so as to not break through the layer below. To give the top of the soap texture, pour up and down zig-zagging down the length of the mold. Then, pour horizontally down the length of the mold. Try pouring in loops or using a small spatula to create interesting texture.

ELEVEN: Dust the top of the soap with Sparkle Gold Mica. Then, still wearing your goggles, close your eyes and gently blow on the mica to lightly press it into the soap. Because mica is so fine, this part can get messy. Be sure to have paper towels and isopropyl alcohol on hand to clean up any mica that sticks to the mold or your work surface. Unmold after 3-4 days, and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks.


TO STAMP: After waiting 3 – 4 days to unmold the soap, cut the loaf into bars that are about an inch wide. Keep in mind that because this is a palm-free recipe, the bars may still be too soft to stamp immediately after cutting. If they’re gummy or sticky, let them sit overnight to firm up.

ONE: Wet your fingers with 99% isopropyl alcohol and rub them on the raised part of the stamp. This will help the mica stick to the stamp.

TWO: Gently press the stamp into the gold mica and tap off any excess. Gently blowing on the stamp will also help to get rid of excess mica (you may want to wear goggles to protect your eyes).

THREE: Press the stamp into the center of the soap. If the soap is hard, you may want to use a mallet with a rubber head to tap the stamp into the soap.

Wait 4 – 6 weeks for the soap to fully cure and your St. Patty’s Day soap is ready to use or give away.

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Make Faux Funnel Pour Soap ~ Soap Queen TV Videohttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/faux-funnel-video/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/faux-funnel-video/#comments Fri, 28 Feb 2014 00:03:38 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36367 In this episode of Soap Queen TV, I show how easy the Faux Funnel pour technique is. But first let’s talk about the name. We call it the Faux Funnel […]

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Faux Funnel Pour Cold Process Soap

In this episode of Soap Queen TV, I show how easy the Faux Funnel pour technique is. But first let’s talk about the name. We call it the Faux Funnel pour because it looks like the funnel pour technique, but you don’t use a funnel! The result is that the layers are a little less even. I think it gives the soap a beautifully organic look and when you cut the soap every slice is a surprise.

 

To make this soap you will need:

  Click here to get everything you need to make this soap!

 

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Soothing Baking Soda Oatmeal Barhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/soothing-oatmeal-bath-bar/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/soothing-oatmeal-bath-bar/#comments Thu, 20 Feb 2014 18:09:11 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=35744 For the ultimate skin-soothing bar of soap, you can’t get much better than this Baking Soda Oatmeal Bar. Made with Castile Rebatch, Oat Extract, Colloidal Oatmeal and baking soda, it […]

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For the ultimate skin-soothing bar of soap, you can’t get much better than this Baking Soda Oatmeal Bar. Made with Castile Rebatch, Oat Extract, Colloidal Oatmeal and baking soda, it has some serious nourishing power. Baking soda provides gentle all-over exfoliation, and oatmeal is renowned for its ability to calm irritate skin. Some customers may prefer this bar unscented so they can enjoy the gentle exfoliation of the baking soda and soothing effect of the oatmeal, but you can certainly add Lavender or Chamomile Essential Oil to give it a mild scent.

Regular soap has a pH anywhere from 8.5 – 10, and this soap is definitely on the low end of the spectrum with a pH of 8. It’s gentle enough for sensitive skin but strong enough to provide plenty of exfoliating cleanliness.

This is also a great recipe for beginning cold process soapers. It uses a rebatch base, which means the soap arrives pre-made and pre-cured; no dealing with lye!  This tutorial uses the double-boiler method, but you can experiment with the plastic baggie technique too. For more on making rebatch soap, check out this Soap Queen TV video.

What You’ll Need:

16 oz. Castile Rebatch
16 oz. Sodium Bicarbonate
3.2 oz  distilled water
.2 oz. Oat Extract
.5 oz. Colloidal Oatmeal
.2 oz. Rolled Oats
.8 oz fragrance or essential oil (optional)
2 lb. Wood Loaf Mold with Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: The rebatch you order from Bramble Berry comes pre-shredded, so you won’t need to worry about that. Set your double boiler on medium heat and add the rebatch. Let the rebatch sit and move on to step 2.

TWO: Mix the baking soda with 3 oz. of distilled water. Stir with a whisk or spoon to combine.

THREE: Add the entirety of the baking soda/water mixture to the rebtach and stir.

FOUR: Add the Colloidal Oatmeal. At this point, the rebatch should start to melt down into more of a paste. If it hasn’t, keep stirring and turn up the heat slightly on the double-boiler.

FIVE: At the Oat Extract and stir.

SIX: Now play the waiting game! After about 20 minutes, the rebatch will start to thicken into a gloppy oatmeal-like texture. That’s what you want. You want to keep your rebatch hydrated, so you may need to add a little extra water if you notice any cracking or if the mixture turns to a clay-like consistency. Keep in mind that the more liquid you add, the softer the soap will be, and the more difficult to pop out of the mold.

We added a tiny (.2 oz) of extra water to keep the soap from getting too dry.

SEVEN: As you can see below, the ideal texture is that of mashed potatoes. At this point you’re ready to spoon it into the mold.

EIGHT: We used a Round Silicone Spoon to scoop the soap into the mold. Because it’s so thick, remember to tamp the mold on the table to eliminate any trapped air bubbles. Garnish with rolled oats.

Wait 2 to 4 days before unmolding. When send our rebatch already cured, so as soon as you cut it’s ready to use right away. Enjoy!

UPDATE:

Many of you have been asking about adding baking soda to regular cold process batter. Our research and development team tested a batch using the same amounts of water and baking soda we used in this recipe, and the results are below:

Lye water and baking soda. Those are chunks are undissolved lye!

Lye water, baking soda and oil. Even after vigorous stick blending, the mixture still wouldn’t combine.

So there you have it! These photos definitely speak for themselves. While we don’t know exactly why baking soda reacts so poorly with lye and soap batter, our guess it has something to do with the baking soda and lye neutralizing each other, thereby interrupting the saponification process. When it comes to baking soda and soap, stick to rebatch!

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Amethyst Garden Soap Tutorial + a Soap Swap Reminderhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/amythest-garden-soap/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/amythest-garden-soap/#comments Thu, 13 Feb 2014 23:15:23 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=35906 We’re midway through our Winter 2014 Soap Swap, and dozens of Swap boxes are arriving daily. If you’ve signed up and haven’t sent your box yet, you have until Monday, […]

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We’re midway through our Winter 2014 Soap Swap, and dozens of Swap boxes are arriving daily. If you’ve signed up and haven’t sent your box yet, you have until Monday, March 17 to get it to the Bramble Berry warehouse. You can send Swap boxes to:

Bramble Berry Inc.
C/O Soap Swap
2138 Humboldt Street
Bellingham, WA 98225

Soap Swaps are a fantastic way to practice your soaping skills and get inspired by fellow soapers. If you haven’t signed up, you still have time! Simply email swap@brambleberry.com to sign up. Be sure to include your name, the fragrance you’d like to use and what type of soap you’re making. If your soap won’t be cured into time to send in, that’s okay too. Simply include a cure date so the recipient knows when they can use it.

We hold swaps three to four times per year, and the best way to find out about the next one is to keep a close eye on the Soap Queen blog. We tear into every box that arrives to the warehouse. These are just a smattering of some of the fantastic soaps that have arrived:

Follow us on Instagram for more Soap Swap photos

And there are countless boxes still to come! The first swappers who send in their boxes will receive a mini handcrafted soap featuring one of my favorite new fragrances. Below is the recipe for the Amethyst Garden Soap, which will be included in every box that arrives to the warehouse early.

This is such a large batch of soap (12 lbs.) that you might want to scale it down to fit in a smaller mold. It would work wonderfully in the 18 or 9 bar mold, for example. This recipe contains 30% Palm, Coconut and Canola oil and 10% Avocado oil.

What You’ll Need:

13.3 oz. Avocado Oil

39.9 oz. Canola Oil

39.9 oz. Coconut Oil

39.9 oz. Palm Oil

18.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

43.8 oz. distilled water

Ultramarine Violet

Black Oxide

Neon Blue Raspberry Colorant

Titanium Dioxide

7. 5 oz. Sunny Herb Garden Fragrance Oil

Comb Swirl Tool

36 Bar Birchwood Mold

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 2 teaspoon of each colorant into 2 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get clumps worked out smoothly. Prepping your colors in the beginning will allow you to work quickly and give you more time to work with your soap.

MOLD PREP: Before you begin, be sure to line the mold with freezer paper (we’re always looking to add products to our line, and a silicone liner for this mold is definitely on the list!). For now, click here to learn how to line the mold yourself.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Avocado, Canola, Coconut and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace.

Because this is such a large recipe, we highly recommend adding Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water so you can release this soap from the mold more quickly. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe, or about 8 teaspoons total for this recipe.

THREE: Split the soap batter equally into four large containers. The full pot of soap batter is heavy. Make sure to have your core engaged before picking it up. After splitting, each container should hold about 6 cups of batter.

FOUR: Add the following colors to the batters at the following rates:

  • In one container, add 2 tablespoons of dispersed Ultramarine Violet.
  • In the second container, add 2 tablespoons of dispersed Titanium Dioxide
  •  In the third container, add 2 tablespoons of dispersed dispersed Neon Blue Raspberry
  • In the last container, add 1 tablespoon dispersed Black Oxide

FIVE: Fill four Squeeze Bottles about 1/3 of the way full and leave them unscented. Set aside until step 8.

SIX: Divide the fragrance roughly between the four containers. Eye balling is okay! Incorporate the fragrance into the batter with a whisk or spoon.

SEVEN: Alternate pouring the batters in big, looping curves. Choose a color order and stick with it until you empty all four containers. Be sure to tamp the mold on the table surface several times between every few pours to release any trapped air bubbles.

EIGHT: Take your Squeeze Bottles from step five. Pour thin, vertical lines up and down the length of the mold. Repeat this process with the other colors, methodically layering one on top of the other in the same order and pattern. Do this until you’ve emptied all the colored squirt bottles. Optional: Finish by running the Comb Swirl Tool once down the length of the mold.

EIGHT: Insert a chopstick or dowel all the way into the soap. Start in the top left-hand corner and drag it back and forth through the soap until you reach the bottom of the mold. Lift it straight up and out when you reach the end.

NINE: Now repeat step eight, but with a twist. Start in the bottom righthand corner and drag the tool up and down through the soap until you reach the other side of the mold.

TEN (optional): You can finish this soap by inserting either our 36 bar or 72 bar divider set.

This is such a large batch of soap that you may need to wait up to a week before attempting to unmold it. If you use dividers, start by gently twisting the side panels off first. With the side panels removed, gently lift the center dividers straight up and out, one-by-one. If at any point the soap sticks to the dividers, don’t force it! It simply means the soap is still too soft and needs to sit for 2 – 3 more days to harden up. Let the soap cure for 4 – 6 weeks and enjoy!

 

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Dandelion Zebra Swirlhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/dandelion-zebra-swirl/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/dandelion-zebra-swirl/#comments Thu, 06 Feb 2014 20:08:17 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=35662 For everyone in the throes of the winter cold snap, today’s cold process recipe offers a little taste of spring. I made this Dandelion Zebra Swirl for a Great Cakes […]

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For everyone in the throes of the winter cold snap, today’s cold process recipe offers a little taste of spring. I made this Dandelion Zebra Swirl for a Great Cakes Soapworks Challenge. The colors are reminiscent of warm days, green grass and freshly sprouted tulips. The key to this technique is having a recipe that moves slowly and stays at a thin trace to get a beautiful layered swirl in the middle.

What You’ll Need:

. 9 oz. Argan Oil
9 oz. Canola Oil
3.6 oz. Castor Oil
13.5 oz. Coconut Oil
9 oz. Palm Oil
9 oz. Sunflower Seed Oil
6.3 oz. Sodium Hydroxide
14.8 oz. water
Fired Up Fuchsia
Ultramarine Violet
Hydrated Chrome Green
Aqua Pearl Mica
Fizzy Lemonade Colorant
Titanium Dioxide Pigment
Brown Oxide Pigment
2.8 oz. Sweet Pea Fragrance Oil
4 lb. Wood Loaf Mold

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of each colorant except the Titanium Dioxide into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Prep a double batch of the Titanium Dioxide by mixing 2 teaspoons of colorant into 2 tablespoons of liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get clumps worked out smoothly. Prepping your colors in the beginning will allow you to work quickly and give you more time to work with your soap.

TOOL PREP: This swirl is achieved by pouring colored layers of soap diagonally down a flat piece of cardboard or other surface. We used a stiff piece of poster board and cut it about 15″ in length to fit snugly into our mold.

MOLD PREP: Before you begin, be sure to line the mold with freezer paper (we’re always looking to add products to our line, and a silicone liner for this mold is definitely on the list!). For now, click here to learn how to line the mold yourself.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Argan, Canola, Castor, Coconut, Sunflower and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

THREE: Once the batter has reached a thin trace, pour off one half cup each into four containers.

FOUR: Add the dispersed colorants to the cups at the following rate:

  • 1/2 tsp. dispersed Hydrated Chrome Green plus  1/2 tsp. Aqua Pearl plus 1/2 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide in one cup
  • 3 tsp. of dispersed Titanium Dioxide in a second cup
  • 1 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide plus 2 tsp. dispersed Fizzy Lemonade Colorant
  • 1/4 tsp. dispersed Brown Oxide in the fourth container

Mix in the colorants with a wire whisk or spoon.

FIVE: In the main batch, add 3 tsp. dispersed Ultramarine Violet and 2 tsp. Fired Up Fuchsia. Mix in with a wire whisk or spoon.

 SIX:Roughly divide the fragrance between the five containers. Eye balling is okay! Mix in with a wire whisk or spoon.

 SEVEN: Pour about 2/3 of the the pink batter into the mold. Tamp the mold on the surface several times to disperse bubbles.

EIGHT: Insert the tool into the soap. We leaned ours at an angle for a more interesting effect. Then pour each color down the board, allowing it to run down into the pink soap below. Experiment pouring from different heights as that will affect the thickness of the layers. We poured yellow first, green second, white third and brown fourth. When you’re done pouring, slowly pull the board up and out at the same angle so as not to disturb the swirl. Keep a small amount (1/4 cup) of each colored batter for the top design at the end.

NINE: Use a square silicone spoon or round silicone spoon to gently plop the remaining pink soap into the mold over your swirl. Be careful! You don’t want to break through the colored layers below.

TEN: Using the colored batter you saved from the swirl, drizzle the colors vertically in a zig-zag pattern down the length of the mold.

Insulate the soap and place on a heating pad for 15 – 20 minutes. Then remove from heat and let it remain covered overnight. Allow the soap to cure for 4 – 6 weeks and then enjoy!

 

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Striped Berry Champagne Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/striped-berry-champagne-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/striped-berry-champagne-cold-process/#comments Fri, 24 Jan 2014 02:58:09 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=31192 Celebrate the new year with a little berry bubbly — but not the kind served in a champagne glass! This ombre-inspired soap features a fabulous fragrance blend of Blackberry Cybilla […]

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Celebrate the new year with a little berry bubbly — but not the kind served in a champagne glass! This ombre-inspired soap features a fabulous fragrance blend of Blackberry Cybilla and Champagne Fragrance Oil, which proved to be a sweet and invigorating combo. We used varying amounts of Red Lab Color for each layer separated by lines of one of my favorite micas, Aqua Pearl.

What you’ll need:

7 oz. Canola Oil

7 oz. Coconut oil

10.5 oz. Olive Oil

7 oz. Palm Oil

3.4 oz. Hazelnut Oil

4.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

11.5 oz. distilled water

Aqua Pearl mica

Red Lab Color

Titanium Dioxide

Fragrance Oil Blend of: 1.5 oz. Blackberry Cybilla and .6 oz. Champagne Fragrance Oil

10” Silicone Loaf Mold

Optional: 5 Easy Pour Mixing containers and droppers

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the Lab Color, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. We like to use a coffee grinder that has a removeable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Then, disperse 2 teaspoons of the colorant into 2 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get clumps worked out smoothly. You’ll also need to dilute a small bottle of Red Lab Color. If you have never diluted Lab Colors before, check out this blog post.

FRAGRANCE PREP: In a glass container, combine the Blackberry Cybilla and Champagne Fragrance Oils. Give the mixture a good stir, and then set it aside.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Canola, Coconut, Olive, Hazelnut and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

THREE: Measure 9 oz. of soap batter into the 5 additional containers. Leave the remaining 5 – 6 oz. of batter in the original container and set it aside until step 13.

FOUR: The gradient will go from darkest to lightest, so begin by adding 15 mL of diluted Red Lab Color to one container of soap batter to form the first layer. Add roughly 1/5 of the fragrance oil blend and stir with a wire whisk or spatula. Once the colorant and fragrance have been fully incorporated into the batter, pour the soap into the mold. Tamp the mold on the table to disperse bubbles.

FIVE: To create the mica vein, use a powder duster to sprinkle a thin layer of Aqua Pearl Mica over the freshly poured red soap. Sprinkling too much mica can cause your layers to separate, so take extra care to achieve just a light dusting of mica. Then, still wearing your goggles, close your eyes and gently blow on the mica to lightly press it into the soap. Because mica is so fine, this part can get messy. Be sure to have paper towels and isopropyl alcohol on hand to clean up any mica that sticks to the mold or your work surface.

SIX: Add 9 mL of diluted Red Lab Color and roughly 1/5 of the fragrance blend to a second cup of soap batter. Blend and stir with a wire whisk or spatula. Once the colorant and fragrance have been fully incorporated into the batter, pour the soap over a spatula in the mold. Be particularly gentle when pouring this second layer of soap because you want to preserve the mica vein and (hopefully) not break through into the first layer.

SEVEN:  Use the powder duster to sprinkle a thin layer of Aqua Pearl Mica over the freshly poured soap.

EIGHT: Add 6 mL of diluted Red Lab Color, 1 teaspoon of dispersed Titanium Dioxide and roughly 1/5 of the fragrance blend to a third cup of soap batter. Blend and stir with a wire whisk or spatula. Once the colorant and fragrance have been fully incorporated into the batter, pour the soap over a spatula into the mold.

NINE: Use the powder duster to sprinkle a thin layer of Aqua Pearl Mica over the freshly poured soap.

TEN: Add 4 mL of diluted Red Lab Color, 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed Titanium Dioxide and roughly 1/5 of the fragrance blend to the fourth cup of soap batter. Blend and stir with a wire whisk or spatula. Once the colorant and fragrance have been fully incorporated into the batter, pour the soap over a spatula into the mold.

ELEVEN: Use the powder duster to sprinkle a thin layer of Aqua Pearl Mica over the freshly poured soap.

TWELVE: Add 2.5 mL of diluted Red Lab Color, 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed Titanium Dioxide and the remaining fragrance blend to a fifth cup of soap batter. Blend and stir with a wire whisk or spatula. Once the colorant and fragrance have been fully incorporated into the batter, pour the soap over a spatula into the mold.

THIRTEEN: Remember that 5 – 6 oz. of batter you set aside at the beginning of the recipe? Add 1 teaspoon of undispersed Aqua Pearl Mica to it and blend with a whisk or spatula. Pour the batter in a horizontal zig-zag pattern across the top of the mold.

FOURTEEN: Starting in the bottom left-hand corner, insert a chopstick or dowel approximately 1/4 inch into the soap. Drag the tool up and down through the soap in a vertical zig-zag, working your way to the other end of the mold.

FIFTEEN: Beginning in the bottom left-hand corner again, use a chopstick or dowel to make miniature figure-8s down the length of the mold. When you reach the edge, lift the tool straight up and out of the soap and start at the top left-hand corner, repeating the pattern down the length of the mold again.

SIXTEEN: Insulate the soap and place on a heating pad for 15 – 20 minutes. Then remove from heat and let it remain covered overnight. Allow the soap to cure for 4 – 6 weeks and then enjoy!

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Cherry Blossom Glitter Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/cherry-blossom-glitter-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/cherry-blossom-glitter-cold-process/#comments Fri, 17 Jan 2014 05:08:12 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=34774 This is quick and easy cold process recipe doubles as a way to recycle scrap cold process bars. Simply shred bars with a cheese grater and you’ve got a great […]

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This is quick and easy cold process recipe doubles as a way to recycle scrap cold process bars. Simply shred bars with a cheese grater and you’ve got a great way to embellish freshly made cold process soap. This soap was fragranced with Cherry Blossom Fragrance Oil, which moves quickly (totally worth it); it smells fantastic in finished soap. If you finish with a little glitter, you’ve got one beautiful bar of soap!

What You’ll Need:

66 oz. Lots of Lather Quick Mix

9.5 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

21.8 oz. distilled water

Neon Blue Raspberry Colorant

Aqua Pearl Mica

Titanium Dioxide

15 – 30 oz. shredded cold process soap

Iridescent Glitter

4 oz. Cherry Blossom Fragrance Oil

18-Bar Birchwood Mold with Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project (aside from the shredded soap) to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

If you don’t want to use the Lots of Lather Quick Mix, you can formulate your own recipe too. Try using some combination of Coconut, Palm Oil, Canola Oil, Olive Oil and Castor Oils. Click here to learn more about formulating your own cold process recipes from scratch. I would use a recipe that was fairly hard (lots of solid oils) to ensure that your already-hard, fully-cured shreds weren’t much harder than your fully cured, final bar of soap. If the shreds are much harder than the rest of the bar, you’ll end up with a bar that has little shreds or soapy nubbins sticking out of the top and sides.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoons of Aqua Peal Mica and 1 teaspoon of Neon Blue Raspberry Colorant into 1 tablespoon of liquid oil each (we like Sweet Almond or Sunflower). Disperse 2 teaspoon of Titanium Dioxide and into 2 tablespoons of oil. Prepping your colors in the beginning will allow you to work quickly and give you more time to work with your soap. Use the mini mixer to get all those clumps worked out smoothly.

SOAP PREP: Shred a few leftover or scrap cold process bars with a cheese grater. You can experiment with different grates, but we found the larger holes on the grater worked best and were most visible in the finished soap. Anywhere from 15 – 30 oz. for this size batch works best, but ultimately how much to shred is up to you. Set the shredded soap aside until step 4.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water, and stir until clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that lasts longer in the shower, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

TWO: Melt the Lots of Lather Quick Mix in the boilable bag it comes in to get it to be liquid. Then you can pour it out and weigh it. Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130°F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace.

THREE: Pour off about 17 oz. of batter into two containers. You’ll have a large amount of soap left over in the original bowl. This is what you want. We’re getting ready to do an In The Pot Swirl into the larger batter container. Add the following dispersed colorants:

  • 6 teaspoons of dispersed Titanium Dioxide in the original, large bowl
  • 1 teaspoon of dispersed Aqua Pearl in one of the 17 oz. containers
  • 1 teaspoon of dispersed Aqua Pearl + 1 teaspoon of dispersed Neon Blue Raspberry in the second 17 oz. container

Mix in the colorants, from lightest to darkest, with a wire whisk or spoon.

FOUR: Divide the Cherry Blossom Fragrance Oil equally among the three containers. Eyeballing is okay! This fragrance slightly accelerates trace, so after you stir it in with a wire whisk or spoon be prepared to move quickly.

FIVE: In the large white batch of soap, add 15 – 20 oz. of the soap shreds. Be sure to save a handful to garnish the top of your finished soap at the end. Incorporate into the batter with a wire whisk or spoon.

SIX: We did a modified in-the-pot-swirl for this recipe by drizzling the colored soap into the titanium dioxide-colored soap in a spiraling pattern from the outside of the bowl, inwards. Pour from a high point so that the soap penetrates the entire depth of the soap in the bowl, which will create a swirl throughout the soap.

If you’d like to try a traditional in-the-pot swirl, start by pouring the aqua-colored soap into the Titanium Dioxide-colored soap in 4 places: 12:00 o’clock, 4:00 o’clock, 8:00 o’clock, and center. Repeat with the Neon Raspberry & Aqua Pearl soap.

SEVEN: Slowly pour the batter in the lined 18-bar Birchwood Mold. Use a spatula to scrape the remaining soap from the bowl. Notice how thick this trace is? It’s important to tamp the mold several times on the work surface to ensure all bubbles that could become trapped in the thick batter rise to the top. You don’t want bubbly pockets in your soap.

Optional EIGHT: Assemble the 18-bar mold dividers and place them straight down into the soap. Keep in mind this step is optional and you don’t have to insert them if you don’t want to. If you don’t want to, simply skip this step and move on to step 9.

NINE: Garnish the top of the soap with any remaining soap shreds and Iridescent Glitter. Spray the entire top with 91 or 99% Isopropyl Alcohol to reduce soda ash.

Cover and insulate for 24 hours and unmold after 3-4 days, and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks. Enjoy!

Bonus!: Check out this quick Instagram video recorded during the making of this soap:

 

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