Soap Queen » Cold Process Soap http://www.soapqueen.com Tutorials on soapmaking, bath fizzies, lotions and more Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:46:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Tile Inlay Cold Process Tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/tile-inlay-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/tile-inlay-cold-process/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:04:45 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=39077 The architecture in Rome is stunning (don’t believe me? Google Image Search Rome + Architecture). Within the various building techniques and styles, the mosaic is among the most popular and […]

The post Tile Inlay Cold Process Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
The architecture in Rome is stunning (don’t believe me? Google Image Search Rome + Architecture). Within the various building techniques and styles, the mosaic is among the most popular and recognizable. Created by placing small, multi-colored pieces of stone within cement, mosaics can be found in many Roman buildings.

Inspired by these intricate mosaics, this Tile Inlay Cold Process project is sure to wow. With a cold process base and pieces of melt and pour to create the design, this soap brings together both soaping techniques. Scented with  Neroli & Shea Blossom and using Lemon Peel Powder for texture, this project brings a bit of Roman architecture to your home!


What You’ll Need:

3.8 oz. Castor Oil

22.8 oz. Coconut Oil

22.8 oz. Olive Oil

19 oz. Palm Oil

7.6 oz. Rice Bran Oil

10.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

25 oz. distilled water

5 oz. Neroli & Shea Fragrance Oil

Lemon Peel Powder

Titanium Dioxide

LCP Clear Melt & Pour Base

Liquid Red

Liquid Blue

Liquid Violet

Liquid Orange

Silicon Tray Mold

18 Bar Birchwood Mold with Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

To make the melt & pour tiles

ONE: Cut 24 oz. of LCP Clear Melt and Pour. Split it into 4 heat-safe containers with about 6 oz. in each. Note: Why LCP soap? Like Cold Process melt and pour soap is short on liquid glycerin (this is why the clarity in the LCP clear isn’t quite as awesome as the traditional house clear base) which means it is less prone to sweating when exposed to moisture. Anything you can do to prevent your melt and pour soap from getting glycerin dew is worthwhile.

TWO: Melt each container individually on 10 second bursts. Be careful! You do not want to scorch the tiny amount of melt and pour in each. Then, add .3 oz. of Neroli and Shea Blossom Fragrance Oil to each and stir.

THREE: Add one color per container in the following rates:

  • 1/8 tsp. Liquid Orange
  • 1/4 tso. Liquid Red
  • 1/2 tsp. Liquid Violet
  • 1/4 tsp. Liquid Blue

Stir to fully incorporate color.

FOUR: Pour a thin layer of colored soap into the Silicone Tray Mold. You can either pour one color, wait 30 minutes for it to dry, unmold it, and then pour another color or pour one color into four separate trays. Spray the top of the soap with 99% alcohol to disperse bubbles.

FIVE: Allow the soap to dry for at least 30 minutes. Once it’s fully dry, unmold it and cut each color into small, square & rectangular chunks. The size you cut is up to you, but our pieces varied between 1 to 1.5 millimeters in length.

SIX: Now comes the important part! This will be the most time-consuming part of the whole process. We cut a large sheet of paper to be the exact size of the 18 Bar Birchwood Mold, and used it as the pattern to lay out our design. That way, we knew exactly what the design would be and how to lay the pieces to save time. We started with an outside layer of blue, followed by orange, and then a cluster of red in the middle. From there, we encircled the red with purple and orange squares. Then, lined the left and right inside edges with purple before forming half circles of blue with another half circle of red inside. Cut orange triangles to fit inside the half circles, and fill in the empty space with purple squares.

To make the cold process base:

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the soap batter, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. We like to use a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Once micronized, disperse 1 tsp. Titanium Dioxide into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Then, disperse 2 teaspoons of lemon peel powder into 2 tablespoons liquid oil.  Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Melt and combine the Olive Oil, Coconut Oil, Castor Oil, Rice Bran Oil and Palm Oil (be sure to melt the entire container of palm oil). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add about 4 tsp. Sodium Lactate.

THREE: Add 2 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide plus 4 tsp. dispersed Lemon Peel powder. Mix in with a whisk.

FOUR: After the colorant has been fully incorporated, mix in the Neroli & Shea Fragrance Oil. Stir with a wire whisk.

FIVE: Once the color and fragrance have been fully incorporated, pour into the mold.

SIX: Now for the tricky part! Here is where you’ll start transferring your design from the pattern you made earlier onto the actual soap. We started from the outside and worked inward. This process can get messy, so be sure to wear gloves. Don’t worry if your melt and pour chunks get cold process on them — you can wipe it off when the soap is dry. You’ll have about a half an hour to transfer your design.

SEVEN: Once you are happy with your design, ensure  all melt and pour pieces are deep enough in the cold process to ensure they do not fall off when the soap is cut into. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 3-4 days before unmolding. After unmolding, carefully cut into the bars and allow to fully cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

The post Tile Inlay Cold Process Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/tile-inlay-cold-process/feed/ 8
Coconut Cream Pie Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/coconut-cream-pie-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/coconut-cream-pie-cold-process/#comments Fri, 11 Jul 2014 00:41:28 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=39339 If you’ve been dreaming of an exotic vacation, this is the soap for you. This Coconut Cream Cold Process tutorial is all the fun of a tropical beach getaway without […]

The post Coconut Cream Pie Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
If you’ve been dreaming of an exotic vacation, this is the soap for you. This Coconut Cream Cold Process tutorial is all the fun of a tropical beach getaway without the sand in your shoes!

Made with 100% coconut water instead of distilled water, and featuring our brand new Coconut Cream Fragrance Oil, it’s a unique soap that smells as good as it looks. The top is finished off with melt & pour soap frosting and cold process “coconut flakes” to make this a truly decadent dessert soap.

Speaking of sunshine, this week we’ve been showing you all kinds of tutorials to give your skin that radiant glow perfect for a summer get away. Check out the Beautiful Bronze Lip Tint, Bronze Goddess Nail Polish and Magical Bronze Shimmer Stick. As a bonus, a few of the ingredients in the tutorials are 20% off as part of this month’s web specials

What You’ll Need:

9.9 oz. Coconut Oil

9.9 oz. Olive Oil

9.9 oz. Palm Oil

3.3 oz. Shea Butter

4.7 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

10.9 oz. 100% pure coconut water (choose a brand with no additional sugars or flavors)

Titanium Dioxide

Brown Oxide

Foaming Bath Whip

4 oz. White Melt and Pour Base

2 oz. Coconut Cream Fragrance Oil

Vanilla Color Stabilizer

2 oz. Chipotle Caramel Fragrance Oil

10″ Silicone Loaf Mold

1M Frosting Tip

Frosting Bag

Droppers

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the soap batter, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. I like to use a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Then, disperse 2 teaspoons of micronized Titanium Dioxide into 2 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Finally, 1 teaspoon of Brown Oxide into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

TOPPING PREP: To achieve the look of toasted coconut flakes on top, grate two different leftover bars of brown & tan cold process soap with a cheese grater. This step is optional and completely up to you, but the shavings do add a nice pop!

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the coconut water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved. Set aside to cool. Be aware: the lye will do some strange things! Check out this awesome progression of color as we added the lye to the liquid. You are watching the lye react with the sugars in the coconut water right before your eyes!

TWO: Fully melt and combine the Olive, Coconut, Palm and Shea Butter. Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. For a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, add about 2 tsp. Sodium Lactate.

THREE: Once the batter has reached a light trace, add all of the Titanium Dioxide mixture. Stir with a whisk.

FOUR: Split off two cups of batter into a separate container. Set aside.

FIVE: To the original batter, add all of the Brown Oxide mixture. Stir with a whisk.

FIVE: The Coconut Cream Fragrance Oil will discolor soap to a light tan, so  only add it to the dark brown soap to retain contrasting colors. Add 2 ounces (by weight) of Coconut Cream Fragrance Oil. Stir with a whisk to incorporate.

SIX: Now for the in-the-pot-swirl! Pour the white soap into the brown soap in four places: 12 o’clock, 3 o’clock, 6 o’clock and 9 o’clock. Pour steadily from a high point to get the color all the way to the bottom of the container.

SEVEN: Run a chopstick or dowel just once through the soap, hitting each entry point. Only swirl once because you don’t want to overmix!

EIGHT: Hold and pour the soap steadily into the mold. Do not move the bowl as you pour. Tamp the mold on the table several times to disperse air bubbles. If you’d like, you can do a fun design on top, but be aware it will soon be covered by soapy frosting! 

NINE: Now make the soapy frosting. Cut and melt 4 oz. of White Melt and Pour base in the microwave on 10 second bursts. Once melted, add 3 mL of Chipotle Caramel Fragrance Oil and 3 mL Vanilla Color Stabilizer. Stir to incorporate.

TEN: Add the White Melt and Pour to 16 ounces of Foaming Bath Whip. Using a hand mixer or stand mixer,  whip the mixture until it can form stiff peaks (usually about 3 – 6 minutes of mixing).

This is a good texture for the frosting. Notice that it’s stiff enough to hold its shape.

ELEVEN: Cut about an inch off the Disposable Frosting Bag and insert the 1M Frosting tip. Then, fill the bag with frosting. 

TWELVE: Frost the top of the loaf. Make short fluffy rows down the length of the mold. Garnish with your “coconut flake” soap shreds. Don’t be afraid to push them into the frosting to secure them.

Allow the soap to sit in the mold for 3-4 days before unmolding. Keep in mind, the melt and pour frosting will not get as hard as cold process frosting. It won’t be sticky or tacky, but you will be able to push and dent the frosting so handle with care! After unmolding, cut into bars and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

The post Coconut Cream Pie Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/coconut-cream-pie-cold-process/feed/ 13
Cotton Candy Cold Process Soaphttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/cotton-candy-cold-process-soap/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/cotton-candy-cold-process-soap/#comments Fri, 04 Jul 2014 01:16:19 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=39286 This is a fun technique that gives you a surprise whichever way you cut your soap. Using squirt bottles I create a cross-hatch pattern in tones of pink and teal. […]

The post Cotton Candy Cold Process Soap appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>

This is a fun technique that gives you a surprise whichever way you cut your soap. Using squirt bottles I create a cross-hatch pattern in tones of pink and teal. Although this technique is easy it does take some time and careful attention to your trace. To make a successful Cotton Candy soap be patient and keep your trace very, very light.

To make this soap you will need:

Click here to get everything you need 

The post Cotton Candy Cold Process Soap appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/cotton-candy-cold-process-soap/feed/ 10
4th of July Fireworks Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/4th-july-fireworks-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/4th-july-fireworks-cold-process/#comments Tue, 17 Jun 2014 23:41:15 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38889 With little ones running around, I like to keep our 4th of July fireworks display kid-friendly — lots of Pop-Its and maybe a heavily supervised sparkler. To imitate the big […]

The post 4th of July Fireworks Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
With little ones running around, I like to keep our 4th of July fireworks display kid-friendly — lots of Pop-Its and maybe a heavily supervised sparkler. To imitate the big booms without actually having to set one off, I created this fun firework-inspired soap. This soap features droplets of gold mica painting and lots of swirly red, white and blue soap to imitate even the most dazzling of fireworks displays. If you make it now, it will be nearly cured just in time the the fourth!

What You’ll Need:

33 oz. Lots of Lather Quick Mix *

4.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

10.9 oz. distilled water

Merlot Mica

Electric Bubblegum

Gold Sparkle Mica

Titanium Dioxide

Ultramarine Blue

1 oz. Grass Stain Fragrance Oil

1 oz. Red Apple Fragrance Oil

9 Bar Birchwood Mold with Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

*If you don’t want to use a Quick Mix, do a long-lasting recipe that has at least 60% liquids or soft butters in it and doesn’t contain over 40% solids.

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the soap batter, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. We like to use a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Then, disperse 1 teaspoon of each colorant into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

FRAGRANCE BLEND: In a glass container, combine 1 oz. of Red Apple and 1 oz. of Grass Stain Fragrance Oils. Set aside.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Fully melt the Lots of Lather Quick Mix and pour into a large bowl that holds at least 48 oz. Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add about 2 tsp. Sodium Lactate.

TWO: Once you’ve reached a thin trace, split the batter equally three ways. Eyeballing is okay!

THREE: Add one color to each container in the following rates:

  • 3 tsp. dispersed Ultramarine Blue.
  • 3 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide.
  • 1 tsp. dispersed Merlot Mica + 2 tsp. dispersed Electric Bubblegum

Mix in with a wire whisk.

FOUR: Split the fragrance oil blend equally between the three containers. Mix with a wire whisk.

FIVE: Pour the blue soap into the mold. Leave about 3 oz. (100 mL) in the container for the top design. Tamp the mold on the table several times to disperse bubbles.

SIX: Now pour the red soap. You may want to pour over a spatula to make nice straight layers. Keep about 3 oz. (100 mL) for the top design.

SEVEN: Pour the white soap. You may want to pour over a spatula to make nice straight layers. Keep about 3 oz. (100 mL) for the top design.

EIGHT: Smooth the white soap over the red soap as best you can to give yourself a flat surface to pour the drops of color. We started with large dollops of blue.

NINE: After you lay down the blue, pour the white and red soap. Using a dropper, drop small amounts of dispersed Gold Sparkle Mica around the circles of color.

TEN: Insert a chopstick or dowel about 1/4 inch inch the soap. Start in the middle of your drops of color and make a circular swirl pattern outward. Don’t be afraid to swirl into another circle or swirl into the drops of gold. This is where you can really get creative!

Allow the soap to sit in the mold for 3-4 days before unmolding. Allow the soap to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy. Happy 4th of July!

The post 4th of July Fireworks Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/4th-july-fireworks-cold-process/feed/ 10
Guest Post: Testing Natural Colorants in Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/guest-post-testing-natural-colorants-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/guest-post-testing-natural-colorants-cold-process/#comments Thu, 05 Jun 2014 20:50:18 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38444 We’re taking today off from our normally scheduled cold process tutorial to show you this fantastically thorough recap of a session at the 2014 Soap Guild. Our guest blogger Jean […]

The post Guest Post: Testing Natural Colorants in Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
We’re taking today off from our normally scheduled cold process tutorial to show you this fantastically thorough recap of a session at the 2014 Soap Guild. Our guest blogger Jean Horn attended Ruth Esteves’ session on natural colorant testing in cold process. Natural colorants are a beautiful option for cold process soaping, but it’s important to know how they behave and which ones will stand the test of time. Read Jean’s excellent recap of the session, and then give natural colorants a try. — A.M.

Ruth was fighting a cold the day she presented, but she was happy to let me snap a picture of her anyway. She did an excellent job on her presentation, and she is co-owner of The Nova Studio in California.

Have you ever thought about moving toward using mostly natural colorants? Is this something your customers are asking for? If so, the information presented in this session will be extremely helpful to you.

Which natural additives will withstand the rigors of cold process? What is a natural colorant? Ruth’s presentation on testing natural colorants contained some great information addressing both of these issues.

Some natural ingredients that can add color to CP soap include plants, spices, Herbs and Botanicals, Clays, vegetables, and fruits. This Brazilian Clay Sampler from Bramble Berry is an example of the beautiful colors that clays lend to Cold Process Soap.  Wow. Aren’t those soaps gorgeous?

Just because a natural ingredient adds color doesn’t mean that it is an FDA approved colorant for soaps and cosmetics. So use them with the caveat that they only are called a colorant on your label if they are approved as such by the FDA. The FDA website offers a wealth of information on the subject. Here’s a jumping off point that shows approved FDA colorants for cosmetics. It’s not limited to natural colorants, though. It also includes synthetics.

That leads to a question. Just what is synthetic vs. natural? Ruth described ‘natural’ as being from the ground and minimally processed. She stressed that there is no concrete definition of ‘natural’. See this post on the Soap Queen Blog about Natural vs. Organic for much more in-depth information on the ambiguity of the term natural in soap and cosmetics.

Some colorants that may have natural components but that are manufactured include micas, oxides, ultramarines, and lakes. FDA colorants are also manufactured. I am personally addicted to colors of all kinds. I love to use natural colorants, but I also love the variety of skin safe manufactured colors that are available. When I choose the colorant for a product, I keep the type of product and the consumer in mind and make my choice accordingly.

This beautiful geode was (and still is – I didn’t make off with it) on display in the hotel. Does anyone else see a soap colored with a natural colorant in the making here?

On to the meat of the session. There are so many natural colorants that we can use to add beautiful color to our soaps. Experimentation is a must so that you know how that colorant will act with your recipe and with your essential oil or fragrance if you choose to scent your soap. The soapmaking process can be very damaging to natural additives, especially plants. The importance of testing is front and center in this Soap Queen blog post.

In her presentation, Ruth laid out a testing procedure for us to teach us how to do our own tests on natural additives as colorants. By using her procedure, we can design colors in our soap that will come out consistently time after time.

Ruth’s method includes testing a small batch of soap before incorporating a new natural additive in a large batch of soap. This allows for troubleshooting without a major investment of materials and cost.

Here’s an abridged version of Ruth’s testing method. The main elements are:

1. A plan

2. The Right Tools

3. Recordkeeping

The Plan:

  1. Choose a recipe for testing purposes. Use one that is as white as possible so you get an accurate representation of the color (try a recipe with canola oil instead of olive oil to prevent that green-ish tinge!).
  2. Test a small batch. Ruth likes to use a one pound batch because it’s small and also makes it easier to calculate amounts needed for larger batches (the 4″ Silicone Loaf Mold is perfect for testing).
  3. Additives may be incorporated in various ways, such as directly into the lye, into the soap at trace, or as an oil infusion.
  4. To gel or not to gel? Ruth recommends testing both ways side by side. The gel phase will often produce a more vibrant hue.

The Right Tools:

  1. Small molds. These don’t have to break the bank. They can be boxes, single bar molds, paper cups, or other non-metal containers. Keep in mind that the containers must be able to withstand the heat of saponification.
  2. Small container in which to mix the soap. Bramble Berry’s Easy Pour Mixing and Measuring Container would be perfect for a one-pound batch. Ruth also suggest the quart-sized round Ziplock containers with the screw on lids

3. Heat Seal Teabags can come in handy when you want to infuse botanicals into the oil.

Record Keeping:

  1. Keep track of what you do.
  2. Refer to the results and use them.
  3. Keeping accurate records allow you to replicate the result. Or not, in the case of a test gone awry.

Ruth provided a testing sheet as a jumping off point. You can fine tune the sheet to include your own recipe and other notes you may find helpful.

Here is Ruth’s 10 Step Testing Procedure. This procedure is applicable for many things, in addition to the natural colorants:

  1. Decide what ingredient you want to test.
  2. Print your testing sheet and fill it out.
  3. Prepare your soap, making lots of notes on additives, amounts and procedures.
  4. Pour soap into molds. Set molds aside.
  5. Unmold the soaps. Cut if necessary.
  6. Assign a batch/control number to each bar. Note this on your testing sheet.
  7. Etch the batch/control number into each test bar.
  8. Take photos.
  9. Let the soap cure.
  10. Take photos, observe results, and note observations.

You can learn more from Ruth’s e-book, Coloring Soap Naturally. She describes the testing process in more detail, and she also shares her test results of 34 natural colorants.

There is a wealth of natural colorant information at Bramble Berry and on the Soap Queen Blog. Here are just a few examples:

Sunday Night Spotlight – Natural Colorants – this one has tons of info and links.

Tutorial: Naturally Colored Eye Candy

Tutorial: Natural Colorant Taiwan Swirl Tutorial

Infusing Herbs, Spices, Teas and Clays

Natural Colorants Online Video

Here’s a really great tutorial for creating an All Natural Rose Clay and Pink Salt Bar on the Otion Blog.

The post Guest Post: Testing Natural Colorants in Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/guest-post-testing-natural-colorants-cold-process/feed/ 2
Juicy Orange & Sweet Rose Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/juicy-orange-sweet-rose-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/juicy-orange-sweet-rose-cold-process/#comments Fri, 30 May 2014 05:12:20 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38414 I’m a huge fan of fancy swirled tops, but for this recipe I decided to switch things up. This orange-scented soap is piled high with orange peels and rose petals, […]

The post Juicy Orange & Sweet Rose Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
I’m a huge fan of fancy swirled tops, but for this recipe I decided to switch things up. This orange-scented soap is piled high with orange peels and rose petals, and the rich orange color comes from paprika — yes, the same paprika that’s probably in your kitchen!

Herbs, botanicals and spices as colorants are some of the best kept secrets in soapmaking, and you can learn more about using them in cold process soaping here. Finally, be aware that although the orange and rose topping is beautiful, they are natural items that will wilt or even mold if left in the shower and in wet conditions long enough.

What You’ll Need:

9.9 oz. Coconut Oil

9.9 oz. Olive Oil

9.9 oz. Palm Oil

3.3 oz. Rice Bran Oil

4.6 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

10.8 oz. distilled water

Paprika

Titanium Dioxide

Ribbon Cut Orange Peels

Rose Petals

1 oz. 10x Orange Essential Oil

10″ Silicone Loaf Mold

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the soap batter, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. We like to use a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Then, disperse 1 teaspoon of the colorant into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Finally, disperse 1 teaspoon paprika into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

NOTE ABOUT THE TOPPING: Keep in mind that although the rose petals and orange peel make for a beautiful top, they will mold if left in the shower or other moist environment. They are purely for decoration. Just like with any organic material, they will wilt and fall off, and unfortunately there is no way to preserve them. If you plan on making this soap to sell, that’s definitely something you’ll want to tell your customers! Just tell them to pick off the herbs on the top – they’ll naturally fall off after a few washings anyways. =)

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Coconut, Olive Oil, Rice Bran and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add about 2 tsp. Sodium Lactate.

THREE: Once you’ve reached a light trace, pour about 2 cups of batter into a second container.

FOUR: Add 3 tsp. dispersed Titanium Dioxide to the original container and 3 tsp. dispersed paprika to the newly poured 2-cup container. Mix in the colorant with a wire whisk.

FIVE: 10x Orange Essential Oil will heavily color soap a bright orange color, so only add it to the paprika-colored batter. Mix in with a wire whisk. Citrus essential oils tend to break up trace, so give the batter a good stir.

SIX: For the in-the-pot swirl, start by pouring the orange-colored soap into the white-colored soap in 4 places: 12:00 o’clock, 4:00 o’clock, 8:00 o’clock, and center. Pour from a high point so the soap penetrates the entire depth of the pot, which will create a swirl throughout the soap.

SEVEN: Using a chopstick or dowel, swirl the soap by running the tool through each of the entry points once. Only once! You want to swirl — but not mix — the soap.

EIGHT: Pour the swirled soap into the mold, keeping the pouring container in one place as the soap fills the mold. Tamp the mold on the tabletop to eliminate any air bubbles.

NINE: Garnish the top of the soap with rose petals and orange peels.

TEN: Unmold the soap after 3-4 days and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks. When you’re ready to cut this soap, turn it on its side to avoid pulling petals or orange peels through your soap and accidentally creating deep drag marks. Enjoy!

The post Juicy Orange & Sweet Rose Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/juicy-orange-sweet-rose-cold-process/feed/ 19
Espresso Shot Cold Process Tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/espresso-shot-cold-process-tutorial/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/espresso-shot-cold-process-tutorial/#comments Thu, 22 May 2014 20:05:33 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=38230 It’s no secret that the Pacific Northwest is the coffee capital of the world. There’s a coffee shop on every corner (sometimes two!), and a never-ending thirst for the latest […]

The post Espresso Shot Cold Process Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
It’s no secret that the Pacific Northwest is the coffee capital of the world. There’s a coffee shop on every corner (sometimes two!), and a never-ending thirst for the latest and greatest new drink. The passion for coffee spills over into passion for soapmaking, so when we brought in the brand new Espresso Fragrance Oil, we went to work designing the most coffee-tastic soap we could.

The Espresso Fragrance Oil is a true espresso scent. Whereas Turkish Mocha has hints of sweetness and cream and Chocolate Espresso Cybilla is brimming with chocolate-y goodness, Espresso is for the coffee purist. Along with a recipe that includes Coffee Butter, Cocoa Butter, Hazelnut Oil and real coffee grounds, this is the ultimate soap for coffee lovers everywhere.

What You’ll Need:

5.5 oz. Cocoa Butter

13.7 oz. Coconut Oil

2.7 oz. Coffee Butter

2.7 oz. Hazelnut Oil

16.5 oz. Olive Oil

13.7 oz. Palm Oil

7.7 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

18.1 oz. distilled water

Brown Oxide

Titanium Dioxide

3.5 oz. Espresso Fragrance Oil

Multi-Pour Sectioning Tool

5 lb. Wood Log Mold with Slide Bottom and Silicone Liner

3 tbsp. coffee grounds

Click here to add everything you need for this project (except the coffee grounds) to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: To ensure that the Titanium Dioxide blends smoothly into the soap batter, we recommend micronizing it before dispersing it in oil. To micronize colorant, simply use a coffee grinder to blend the colorant to break up any clumps of color and prevent streaks of white from showing in the final soap. We like to use a coffee grinder that has a removable, stainless steel mixing area for easy cleaning. Then, disperse 1 teaspoon of the colorant into 1 tablespoon of Sunflower or Sweet Almond Oil (or any other liquid oil). Then, disperse 1 teaspoon Brown oxide into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

COFFEE GROUNDS: You can use either dry or used coffee grounds for this project. If you do use dry grounds like we did, be aware that they may “bleed” and form a small halo of color around them. If you don’t want the halo effect, make yourself a pot of joe and use the leftover grounds!

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Cocoa Butter, Coconut Oil, Coffee Butter, Hazelnut Oil, Olive Oil and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add about 3 tsp. Sodium Lactate.

THREE: Once the batter has reached a light trace, pour 3 cups of the soap batter into a separate container.

FOUR: Add 1 tbs. of coffee grounds into the small container, and 2 tbs. of coffee grounds into the larger container. Use a whisk to gently combine.

FIVE: Add 3 tps. of the dispersed Titanium Dioxide into the large container. Use a whisk to mix in.

SIX: Add 3 tps. dispersed Brown Oxide to the small container, and use a whisk to thoroughly combine.

SEVEN: Add half of the Espresso Fragrance Oil to the small container, and half to the large container. You can eyeball it, but if you want to be exact then add 1.7 oz. of fragrance to each container. Use a whisk to mix in.

EIGHT: Gently pour the brown soap into the center of the Multi-Pour Sectioning Tool. To help the soap batter evenly spread throughout the middle section, you can alternate pouring from each end.

NINE: Once the center section is full, pour the white batter into the outside sections.

TEN: Pour slowly, and alternate pouring into different ends to evenly disperse the batter in the Multi-Pour Sectioning Tool.

 ELEVEN: Once all sections are full, slowly remove the center piece straight up out of the soap. Set aside.

TWELVE: Slowly pull the long center dividers straight up, and set aside.

THIRTEEN: Pull the small end liners straight out, and set aside.

FOURTEEN: Once all the pieces have been removed, tap the soap mold firmly on the table to smooth out the sections and release any air bubbles. Beginning in the corner of the mold, insert a wooden chopstick or dowel to the bottom of the mold and make a zig-zag pattern at a 45 degree angle down the length of the mold. 

FIFTEEN: Once you have created the zig-zag down the length of the mold once, it’s time to go back and do it again! Starting on the opposite corner on the same end of the mold you began with the first time, use your chopstick or dowel to cross through the existing lines, creating an argyle-like pattern.

SIXTEEN: Gently place whole coffee beans in the center of each swirl. Spray with 99% isopropyl alcohol to prevent soda ash.

SEVENTEEN: Allow the soap to sit in the mold for 3-4 days before unmolding. Cut soap between the coffee beans, so they are in the center of each bar. Allow the soap to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

The post Espresso Shot Cold Process Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/espresso-shot-cold-process-tutorial/feed/ 18
Rose Garden Cold Process Soap Tutorialhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/rose-garden-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/rose-garden-cold-process/#comments Thu, 15 May 2014 20:06:12 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=37762 Two weeks of deals, sales and tutorials ends today with this beautiful Rose Garden Cold Process tutorial. This is a two-part recipe so it is more time intensive than other […]

The post Rose Garden Cold Process Soap Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
Two weeks of deals, sales and tutorials ends today with this beautiful Rose Garden Cold Process tutorial. This is a two-part recipe so it is more time intensive than other cold process recipes, but the flowery result is worth it.

The first part is making the soapy roses out of cold process frosting, and the second part is creating the beautifully swirled base and topping it all off with exquisite mica painting. This tutorial combines several advanced soaping skills, including soap frosting, working with rose water lye and the hanger swirl technique, so it’s great for anyone looking to expand their soapy repertoire. This is a multi-day project; you need at least a day for the roses to be set up enough to move.

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

Click here to add everything you need to make the roses and the loaf to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

To make the soapy roses:

2.8 oz. Avocado Oil

5.6 oz. Coconut Oil

5.6 oz. Palm Oil

2 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

4.6 oz. distilled water

Fired Up Fuchsia

Frosting Bag

1M Frosting Tip

1 oz. Baby Rose Fragrance Oil

Stand Mixer with 5 Quart Glass Bowl

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of Fired Up Fuchsia into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil. We use Sweet Almond or Sunflower oil. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

LYE & OIL PREP: In order to get soapy frosting to actually look like frosting, the lye and oils must be very cold. We recommend making the lye water a full day ahead of time, clearly labeling it and keeping it in a refrigerator not used for food. If you must use a food refrigerator, be sure to put a sign on the outside of the fridge clearly letting everyone know there is lye inside. The lye should be around 60 degrees F before adding it to the oils. Additionally, you want your oils to be around 70 degrees F. You can even refrigerate them for several hours too! They should be semi-solid at this temperature.

ONE: With a hand mixer (or a Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer), whip the oils for 1 – 2 minutes. Occasionally take a break to scrape the bowl and sides of the container to incorporate all the oils. You want the oils to be nice and fluffy before adding the lye.

TWO: When your oils have thickened, turn off the mixer and slowly add the lye water. Swirl the batter around with a spatula or whisk before turning the mixer on a low setting. Scrap any batter that has splattered on the side of the container and then turn the mixer to a medium setting. Continue to whip for another 3 – 7 minutes.

THREE: When the lye is fully mixed and the batter has thickened, add 1 teaspoon dispersed Fired Up Fuchsia. Whip the colorant into the batter.

FOUR: When the pink coloring is even, add 1 oz. of Baby Rose Fragrance Oil. Whip the batter until it can form stiff peaks. Don’t be surprised when the fragrance oil thins out the frosting considerably and you find yourself whipping for a few more minutes again.

FIVE: Cut off about a half inch from the tip of the frosting bag and push the tip through. Then, if your frosting can hold shape, scoop it into the bag. Lay down a piece of parchment paper (we used a clean 18-bar Birchwood Silicone Liner) and then start making the roses. Start on the outside and work your way into the middle, keeping your movements small and tight. Our roses were about 1.5 inches in diameter. Work quickly! After about 10 – 15 minutes, the frosting will start to harden and you’ll begin to notice more and more air bubbles in your roses. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, they just won’t look as smooth.

Allow the roses to harden for 24 hours before moving on and making the base.

Check out this Instagram video on the full process below!

To make the base:

16.5 oz. Canola Oil

16.5 oz. Coconut Oil

16.5 oz. Palm Oil

9.9 oz. Rice Bran Oil

6.6 oz. Shea Butter

9.1 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

21.7 oz. Rose Water

Ultramarine Violet

Amethyst Purple Mica

Green Chrome Oxide

Titanium Dioxide

4 oz. Rosehip Jasmine Fragrance Oil

18 Bar Birchwood Mold with Silicone Liner

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of Ultramarine Violet and Green Chrome into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil each. We use Sweet Almond or Sunflower oil. Disperse 2 teaspoons of Amethyst Purple Mica and Titanium Dioxide into 2 tablespoons of liquid oil each. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the rose water and gently stir. You’ll notice the lye might do some strange things! If any floaty chunks appear or if the lye doesn’t go clear, that’s okay. Still for 1 – 2 minutes to dissolve the lye as best you can, but keep in mind it will not clear up like regular lye water. Set aside to cool to 100 – 110 degrees F.

TWO: Combine the Canola, Coconut, Rice Bran, Shea and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 120 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until light to medium trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water.

THREE: When you’ve reached a light to medium trace, split a portion of the batter into two separate containers. Split off about 3 cups of batter into the two additional containers. Whisk in the following dispersed colors:

  • Add the entirety of the dispersed Titanium Dioxide (2 tablespoons total) to the original large container.
  • Add 3 teaspoons dispersed Ultramarine Violet to one of the 3 cup containers.
  • Add 2 teaspoons of dispersed Green Chrome to the second 3 cup container.

FOUR: Split the Rosehip Jasmine Fragrance Oil between the three containers and whisk.

FIVE: Pour a layer of white batter into the mold. Pour just enough to cover the bottom of the mold entirely.

SIX: Next, pour most of the purple batter (a half cup or so left behind is okay). At this point your batter might be getting thick, so use a spatula to spread it over the white layer, almost as if you were frosting a cake.

SEVEN: Repeat step 6 with the green batter.

EIGHT: Pour a second layer of white batter. Be sure to leave yourself about a half cup or so to finish off the top. Spread the white batter over the green batter with a spatula.

NINE: Scrape the sides of your containers and empty all the purple and green batters for the next layer. Smooth them over with a spatula.

TEN: With the remaining half cup of white batter, pour a final layer. The soap may be very thick at this point, so be sure to tamp the mold on the table several times to release any air bubbles.

ELEVEN: Now for the fun part! This technique is called a Hanger Swirl, and to achieve it we bent one of our reeds to fit into the 18 Bar Birchwood Mold. If you don’t have a reed, you can use the item from which this technique gets its name — a bent metal hanger! Starting at one end of the mold, push the ‘hanger’ straight down to the bottom of the mold. While it’s still in the soap, drag it along the bottom of the mold about an inch through the soap before pulling it up and out. With the tool above the soap, move it up another inch up, and then push it back down. Repeat this process, slowly inching the tool up and out, until you reach the end of the mold.

TWELVE: Because your soap will be thick at this point, it’s very important to tamp it hard on your work surface. This will ensure the soap will fill in the gaps left by your hanger tool. You can also carefully smooth the white soap over with a spatula if it becomes uneven. Once you’re satisfied with the white soap, use a dropper to drizzle dispersed Amethyst Purple mica in a zig-zag pattern horizontally on top of the mold.

THIRTEEN: Insert a chopstick or dowel about 1/4 inch into the soap and drag it in a zig-zag pattern vertically until you reach the other end of the mold.

FOURTEEN: When you’ve reached the other end of the mold, make the same zig-zag pattern horizontally across the mold. You may need to tamp down the mold several more times to fill in any gaps left by the swirl tool.

FIFTEEN: When you’re satisfied with your swirl, place your soapy roses four across the mold. We had enough space for 20 roses on top (five rows of four), but it may vary depending on the size of your roses.

Allow the soap to harden for 2 – 3 days before unmolding. After unmolding, cut the soap into rows formed by the roses, and then again so that each bar has its own rose. Allow it to cure for 4 – 6 weeks and enjoy!

The post Rose Garden Cold Process Soap Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/rose-garden-cold-process/feed/ 15
Black, White and Gold All Over Cold Processhttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/black-white-gold-cold-process/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/black-white-gold-cold-process/#comments Thu, 24 Apr 2014 18:10:45 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=37063 We’re all about intricate swirls, lovely layers and exotic techniques, but sometimes you want something simple and elegant. This two-layer soap features a classic black and white color scheme. The […]

The post Black, White and Gold All Over Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
We’re all about intricate swirls, lovely layers and exotic techniques, but sometimes you want something simple and elegant.

This two-layer soap features a classic black and white color scheme. The key to this technique is keeping the layers smooth and straight. The little something special in this recipe comes from the Bamboo Powder extract, which is a mild exfoliant added to the bottom white layer. This soap was finished with gold mica painting, which popped beautifully against a black background. Who says simple can’t be pretty?

Keep in mind that this soap does have a light grey lather, although it’s almost unnoticeable on your hands. If you’d like a white later, consider adding 1/2 tsp. or even 1/4 tsp. dispersed Black Oxide colorant (less than we used), but keep in mind you won’t end up with the same black color in the photos. Additionally, the gold topped mica won’t last for more than a wash or two, but we still think it’s worth it!

What You’ll Need:

4. 9 oz. Avocado Oil

8.2 oz. Canola Oil

9.9 oz. Coconut Oil

8.2 oz. Palm Oil

1.6 oz. Shea Butter

4.6 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

10.8 oz. distilled water

Titanium Dioxide

Black Oxide

2 oz. Fresh Zucchini Flower Fragrance Oil

Bamboo Extract

Gold Sparkle Mica

Dropper

10″ Silicone Loaf Mold

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of Titanium Dioxide into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil and 1 teaspoon Black oxide into 1 tablespoon of light liquid oil. We use Sweet Almond or Sunflower oil. Then, disperse 2 teaspoon sparkle gold mica in 1 tablespoon of liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get the clumps of color worked out smoothly.

EXTRACT PREP: The Bamboo Extract will mix in much better if you disperse it in a light liquid oil first. Disperse 1 tablespoon of Bamboo Extract into 2 teaspoons of oil, such as Sweet Almond or Sunflower. Mix with a mini mixer and then set aside.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Avocado, Canola, Coconut, Shea Butter and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 120 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until medium trace. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add Sodium Lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of Sodium Lactate per pound of oils in the recipe.

Note: Half of the soap is white in this design, which makes it a prime candidate for forming glycerin rivers. Although harmless, you can prevent glycerin rivers by soaping colder. You may want to try this recipe with your lye around 100 degrees F and your oils around 90 degrees F.

THREE: When the batter reaches a medium trace, split it equally into two containers.

FOUR: To one container, add 2 teaspoons dispersed Titanium Dioxide and 1 tablespoon of the Bamboo Extract mixture. Mix with a whisk.

FIVE: Add roughly half the fragrance oil. Mix with a whisk.

SIX: You want the white layer to be thick enough to support the black layer above, so stick blend the batter on short bursts for 15 – 20 seconds until it reaches a thick trace.

SEVEN: Pour all of the white batter into the mold. Use a spatula to get every last bit of batter out of the container.

EIGHT: In the second batter container, add 1 teaspoon of dispersed Black Oxide and the remainder of the fragrance oil. Mix in with a wire whisk. You want this batter to have a slightly thinner consistency so it pours nicely over the white soap.

NINE: Pour the black soap over a spatula or spoon so you don’t break through the white layer below. You want a nice straight divide between the two colors, so take your time when pouring the black layer.

TEN: Get the black soap as smooth as you can so you’ll have a nice surface to draw your mica lines. We smoothed the soap out with the back of a Square Silicone Spoon.

ELEVEN: Using the dropper, drizzle an S-shaped curve of dispersed Gold Sparkle Mica on top of the soap (top left and right photos). Then, drag a chopstick or dowel in an S-shaped curve length-wise across the soap (bottom left photo). Finish the design by drawing the same S-curve width-wise through the soap (bottom right photo).

The resulting top design will look like this:

To prevent glycerin rivers, pop this soap in the freezer for 1 – 2 hours. Take it out and allow it to harden for 3 – 4 days before unmolding. When you cut this soap, flip it over so the mica side is facing down and then cut. That way, you won’t drag mica through your soap. Allow it to cure for 3 – 4 weeks and enjoy!

The post Black, White and Gold All Over Cold Process appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/black-white-gold-cold-process/feed/ 10
Havana Classic: Neptune Column Pour + free templatehttp://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/havana-classic-starfish-column-pour/ http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/havana-classic-starfish-column-pour/#comments Tue, 25 Mar 2014 20:38:59 +0000 http://www.soapqueen.com/?p=36252 The Havana Classic series wraps up this week with one final tutorial — the Neptune Column Pour. Typically this look is achieved by pouring the soap batter over a weighed […]

The post Havana Classic: Neptune Column Pour + free template appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
The Havana Classic series wraps up this week with one final tutorial — the Neptune Column Pour. Typically this look is achieved by pouring the soap batter over a weighed column shape. Check out page 74 in the Soap Crafting book for an example of this technique. In this project, we put a little twist on the traditional column. Instead of a 4-point rectangle shown in the Soap Crafting book, we poured over a 5-point star, resulting a beautiful and unique pattern. The star template is included for free in this tutorial.

Tomorrow is the last day of the Havana Classic series, and don’t forget that all of our original silicone molds are 30% off until Wednesday, March 26 at 12 noon PST. Enter coupon code HAVAMOLD during checkout to get in on the deals!

What You’ll Need:

9.9 oz. Avocado Oil

3.3 oz. Cocoa Butter

13.2 oz. Coconut Oil

6.6 oz. Mango Butter

19.8 oz. Olive Oil

13.2 oz. Palm Oil

9 oz. Sodium Hydroxide

21.7 oz. distilled water

Ultramarine Blue

Hydrated Chrome Green

Titanium Dioxide

Yellow Oxide

Brick Red Oxide

Tangerine Wow

4 oz. Tobacco and Bay Leaf Fragrance Oil

Free 5-Pointed Star Column Template

18 Bar Birchwood Mold with Silicone Liner

Click here to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

If you’ve never made Cold Process soap before, stop here! I highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on Cold Process Soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including my newest book, Soap Crafting. You can also checkout the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices! That means goggles, gloves and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, and other distractions and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

COLORANT PREP: The colors in this project are special blends. Prepare them ahead of time in the following ratios. We recommend dispersing colorants in liquid oils, such as Sweet Almond or Sunflower oil:

  • Dark Blue: 1/2 teaspoon Ultramarine Blue + 1/2 teaspoon Hydrated Chrome Green dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • Aqua: 1 teaspoon Titanium Dioxide + 1/2 teaspoon Hydrated Chrome Green dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • White: 1 tablespoon Titanium Dioxide dispersed in 2 tablespoons liquid oil.
  • Yellow: 1 teaspoon Yellow Oxide dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.
  • Red: 1/4 teaspoon Brick Red Oxide + 1 teaspoon Tangerine Wow dispersed in 1 tablespoon liquid oil.

For more on preparing colorants for cold process soaping, check out this SQTV Short.

TOOL PREP:

You will need to create two star-shaped columns for this design. We made ours out of cardboard but you can use whatever you have on hand.

ONE: Cut out the template along the solid lines. Place the large rectangles over your cardboard and cut the cardboard to size along the edges using a craft knife.

TWO: Use a pen or pencil and mark out the dashed lines on your cardboard. These lines indicate the mountains and valleys which will result in an accordion shape and form the body of the column. Mark the A’s and B’s on your cardboard as well. These will indicate the edges you need to tape together in later steps.

THREE: Place a ruler between the marks and use a craft knife to score your cardboard along the ruler. You will score one side of the cardboard for one set of dotted lines and the other side of the cardboard for the other set of lines. This will ensure that you are able to fold your cardboard correctly creating the accordion shape you see in the photo below.

From top left — Step 1: Cutting the paper to the template size. Step 2: The cut out pieces. Step 3: Marking the cut outs along the lines of the template. Step 4: Scoring the cut out along the lines, connecting the marks made in Step 3. Step 5: The accordion-folded cut out. Remember to score each line on the opposite side so you can fold the paper into an accordion shape. Step 6: Tape the sides with the same corresponding letter together.

FOUR: Lay both of your cardboard accordions down and line up the edges marked with an A. These should rise to a ridge. Tape these two pieces together along this ridge. This will be the bottom part of your star between the two bottom legs.

FIVE: Join the two edges marked with B together and again tape along the ridge. At this point you should be able to shape your two accordion pieces into the shape of a 5-pointed star. To ensure they hold shape tape one of the star-shaped end caps on one end of the tube.

SIX: Now you should have an open ended column in the general shape of a 5-pointed star. Fill this column with some sort of weight. We used small rocks, but you can use anything that will help hold the column down so the soap does not pick it up and move it. Make sure your column retains its five-pointed shape while filling it.

SEVEN: Once your column is filled, tape the other end cap on. We taped one point at a time and once the first two were taped we found it easier to lay the column on its side and rotate it through the remaining points. This helped the column keep its shape since we used a relatively lightweight cardboard. If you are using a heavier cardboard this likely won’t be a concern. Ensure both end caps are secure and now your star columns are ready for your mold.

Top left — Step 7: Taping the sides with corresponding letters together. Step 8: Taping the open side together. Step 9: Your star is starting to take shape. Step 10: Cutting out the star-shaped end pieces. Step 11: Taping the end pieces to the column. Step 12: Don’t forget to fill your column with something heavy before sealing it shut!

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the lye to the water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

TWO: Combine the Avocado, Cocoa Butter, Mango Butter, Coconut, Olive and Palm oils (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of Palm Oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130 degrees or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace.

THREE: Once the batter has reached light trace, split it equally into five containers.

FOUR: Add the dispersed colorant mixtures. Whisk in one color per container in the following amounts:

  • 2 teaspoons dispersed Yellow + 1/4 teaspoon dispersed White
  • 1.5 teaspoons dispersed Red
  • 3 teaspoons dispersed White
  • 2 teaspoons dispersed Dark Blue
  • 3 teaspoons dispersed Aqua

FIVE: Divide the fragrance equally among the five containers. Incorporate with a wire whisk.

SIX: Pour a tiny amount (about 1/8 of the bottle) of White soap in a squeeze bottle. This is for any final embellishment after you pour the design. Set aside.

SEVEN: Decide on a color order and stick with it for the entirety of the pour. Then pour the first color in the center of the star column while counting to 3. Repeat this step with the other colors, again counting to three. Repeat the process until the containers have been emptied.

EIGHT: When the containers are empty, slowly remove the column from the soap. Have a container waiting near by to set the column in.

NINE: Using the squeeze bottle you poured in step six, embellish the area where the column was removed. We made small dots to make the soap look like flowers.

Spray with isopopyl alcohol and then insulate the soap and place on a heating pad for 15 – 20 minutes. Then remove from heat and cover it overnight. Allow the soap to cure for 4 – 6 weeks and then enjoy!

The post Havana Classic: Neptune Column Pour + free template appeared first on Soap Queen.

]]>
http://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-body-tutorials/cold-process-soap/havana-classic-starfish-column-pour/feed/ 17